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Interest in ‘self-plagiarism’

 


Mark Israel

Mark Israel’s article in Research Ethics Monthly on ‘Self-plagiarism?’ has been receiving a little interest outside Australia and New Zealand. It was reposted by the LSE Impact of Social Sciences Blog, and listed by Retraction Watch. Given that it offered guidance on the ethics of republishing in another language, it was nice to hear that the five pieces of advice had been translated into Mandarin by Zheng-Rong Gan for use at National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan (reproduced below with her permission).

  • Assess whether your reasons are ethically defensible; 評估這麼做的理由在倫理上是否站得住腳
  • Seek the agreement of those involved in your first publication – co-authors, editors and publishers; in some cases, publishers will want a specific form of acknowledgement; 尋求出現在第一次出版相關文章/文字者的同意,其中可能包含共同作者、編輯、出版商(有時會要求有特定的認可方式)
  • Seek the agreement of those involved in the new publication that will be reproducing material – any co-authors, editors and publishers; 尋求此次新出版相關文章/文字者的同意,其中可能包含共同作者、編輯、出版商等
  • Clearly acknowledge in the new publication that you are drawing on the earlier publication and do so with the agreement of the various parties, 在新出版品中清楚註記出處,且註記方式能被原出版者及新出版者所認可
  • Where it would be misleading not to do so, also note the relationship between publications in your CV and any job or grant applications在您的學術履歷、研究經費或升等之類文件,務必清楚註記這些前後出版品的關係,以避免被誤解或重複計算發表篇數等

There were a few responses to the LSE Blog. One respondent pointed out the concept of ‘self-plagiarism’ is self-contradictory as one cannot plagiarise one’s own work. Mark Israel agrees with this respondent, notes that the term is in wide use and recognises that its use should be challenged. The same respondent pointed to the Ingelfinger Rule which has been adopted by journals who refuse to publish articles that have already been published elsewhere. The Rule has been modified and challenged over time, most recently in relation to the use of preprint servers (see Resnik, 2018).

Contributor
Mark Israel, Senior Consultant AHRECS | Profile | mark.israel@ahrecs.com

This post may be cited as:
Israel, M. (27 March 2019) Interest in ‘self-plagiarism’. Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/research-integrity/interest-in-self-plagiarism

 

 

 

Anwar Ali Siddiqui says:

Though I agree that duplicate publication and reusing a substantial chunk of your own previously published work all come under self-plagiarism, but lately, it has been observed that in many epidemiological and the so-called genetic studies dealing with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs), same control group data is repeatedly used for many targeted diseases. clearly, in each of such study, fresh consent is not taken. Would this be considered as self-plagiarism?



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