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Research Ethics MonthlyISSN 2206-2483

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

A Model for the Participation of Indigenous Children and Young People in Research

 


Following my September 2017 piece: Ethics and the Participation of Indigenous Children and Young People in Research, this article briefly overviews the research model I developed in my PhD. The model is based on a children’s rights-based approach (CRBA) to research informed by Indigenous research methodologies. It combines Laura Lundy’s[1] analysis of Article 12 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) with aspects of Indigenous research methodologies articulated by Ray (Indigenous convergence methodology)[2] and Nakata (Indigenous standpoint theory).[3] The field research methods sought to engage with children and young people in a culturally appropriate and child friendly way by using Bessarab and Ng’andu’s[4] ‘yarning’ approach, as well as a range of other child friendly and play based methods such as drawing, modelling with playdough, as well as photography and peer-to-peer video interviewing using iPads[5].

Lundy’s diagram below highlights the interpretation of Article 12 of the CRC adopted in the research. This interpretation emphasises that Article 12 requires governments to ensure children and young people not only have the opportunity to voice their views about matters affecting them, but that their views are taken into consideration and influence the decisions that are made.

Lundy’s Conceptualisation of Article 12[6]

The child rights-based model used prioritised child-centred play in the research process and engaged with children, rather than doing research on or about children[7]. Some of these interactions are depicted below in the photographs.

10-Year-Old Child Modelling Something that is Important to Him—‘My Family’[8]

10-Year-Old Child Modelling Something that is Important to Him—‘I Like Toys, and Robots … and Dreamtime and Culture Dance’[9]

Experimental Photography, Testing the Functionality of the iPads [10]

Making an iPad Video [11]

Taking part in social research can expose Indigenous children and young people to varying degrees of risk however ‘the line between gate-keeping intended for the protection of participants and their communities and the risk of sliding into paternalism is a thin one.’[12] Research that is carried out in an ethically robust, age appropriate and culturally sensitive way can present avenues for Indigenous children and young people to express their views and have these views taken into consideration in accordance with Article 12 of the CRC.

This research suggests Indigenous children and young people are ready, willing and able to voice their perspectives about matters affecting them, if given the opportunity in appropriate circumstances and in an appropriate setting. The findings of this research debunk conceptualisations of Indigenous children and young people as passive and vulnerable. The implications of viewing and defining Indigenous children and young people in this way limits their civic participation and reduces opportunities for their voice to be heard about matters affecting them.

A children’s rights-based approach to research positions children and young people as empowered co-researchers, with expertise and valuable perspectives capable of leading and informing the research process. It is an approach which engages children and young people in research in a collaborative way that fulfils, promotes and protects a range of rights provided for by the CRC, in particular, their rights to participate in decision making processes.

For more information about the research model see Doel-Mackaway, Holly, ‘I think it’s Okay … But it’s Racist, it’s Bad Racism’: Aboriginal Children and Young People’s Views about the Intervention’ (2017) 43(1) Monash University Law Review 76.

In 2018 Routledge is publishing a book about this PhD research.

References

Barker, John and Susie Weller, ‘“Is It Fun?” Developing Children Centred Research Methods’ (2003) 23(1/2) International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 33.

Bat, Melodie et al, ‘Ethical Moves: Innovation in Qualitative Research: An Example of an Ethical and Effective Cross-Cultural Research Methodology Using Video’ (Paper presented at the AARE Annual Conference, Canberra, 2009);

Bessarab, Dawn and Bridget Ng’andu, ‘Yarning about Yarning as a Legitimate Method in Indigenous Research’ (2010) 3(1) International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies 37.

Coram, Stella, ‘Rethinking Indigenous Research Approval: The Perspective of a “Stranger”’ (2011) 11(2) Qualitative Research Journal 38.

Kral, Inge (2010) ‘Plugged In: Remote Australian Indigenous Youth and Digital Culture’ (Working Paper No 69/2010, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, May 2010). http://caepr.anu.edu.au/Publications/WP/2010WP69.php

Lundy, Laura, ‘“Voice” Is Not Enough: Conceptualising Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child’ (2007) 33 British Educational Research Journal 927.

Nakata, Martin, Disciplining the Savages: Savaging the Disciplines (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2007), chapter 11.

Ray, Lana, ‘Deciphering the “Indigenous” in Indigenous Methodologies’ (2012) 8(1) AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 85, 88, 88. See also Lester-Irabinna Rigney, ‘Indigenist Research and Aboriginal Australia’ in Julian Kunnie and Nomalungelo Ivy Goduka (eds), Indigenous Peoples’ Wisdom and Power: Affirming Our Knowledge Through Narratives (Ashgate Publishing, 2006) 32.

Contributor
Dr Holly Doel-Mackaway | Lecturer | Macquarie Law School |
Dr Doel-Mackaway’s Macquarie staff page | holly.doel-mackaway@mq.edu.au

This post may be cited as:
Doel-Mackaway H. (2017, 20 October 2017) A Model for the Participation of Indigenous Children and Young People in Research Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/model-participation-indigenous-children-young-people-research

Footnotes

[1]Laura Lundy, ‘“Voice” Is Not Enough: Conceptualising Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child’ (2007) 33 British Educational Research Journal 927.
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[2]Lana Ray, ‘Deciphering the “Indigenous” in Indigenous Methodologies’ (2012) 8(1) AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 85, 88, 88. See also Lester-Irabinna Rigney, ‘Indigenist Research and Aboriginal Australia’ in Julian Kunnie and Nomalungelo Ivy Goduka (eds), Indigenous Peoples’ Wisdom and Power: Affirming Our Knowledge Through Narratives (Ashgate Publishing, 2006) 32.
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[3]Martin Nakata, Disciplining the Savages: Savaging the Disciplines (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2007), chapter 11
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[4]Dawn Bessarab and Bridget Ng’andu, ‘Yarning about Yarning as a Legitimate Method in Indigenous Research’ (2010) 3(1) International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies 37.
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[5]Melodie Bat et al, ‘Ethical Moves: Innovation in Qualitative Research: An Example of an Ethical and Effective Cross-Cultural Research Methodology Using Video’ (Paper presented at the AARE Annual Conference, Canberra, 2009); Inge Kral, ‘Plugged In: Remote Australian Indigenous Youth and Digital Culture’ (Working Paper No 69/2010, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, May 2010).
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[6] Laura Lundy, ‘“Voice” is Not Enough: Conceptualising Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child’ (2007) 33(6) British Educational Research Journal 927, 932
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[7]John Barker and Susie Weller, ‘“Is It Fun?” Developing Children Centred Research Methods’ (2003) 23(1/2) International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 33, 33.
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[8]10-year-old male, Primary Class Group Discussion, Field Research Session 1 (of 4) (Northern Territory, 13 May 2014).
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[9] 10-year-old male, Primary Class Group Discussion, Field Research Session 1 (of 4) (Northern Territory, 13 May 2014).
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[10]14-year-old male, Secondary Class Group Discussion, Field Research Session 3 (of 4) (Northern Territory, 20 May 2014).
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[11] 10-year-old male, Primary Class Group Discussion, Field Research Session 1 (of 4) (Northern Territory, 13 May 2014
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[12]Stella Coram, ‘Rethinking Indigenous Research Approval: The Perspective of a “Stranger”’ (2011) 11(2) Qualitative Research Journal 38, 45.



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