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Release of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research 2007 (updated 2018) – With interview0

 

The revised National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research 2007 (updated 2018) was released on 9 July 2018.

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Content of the updated National Statement

The National Statement consists of a series of guidelines made in accordance with the National Health and Medical Research Council Act 1992 and is subject to rolling review. This means that parts of the National Statement are updated as needed, in accordance with strategic planning, or in response to user feedback or national or international developments in research or ethics.

Since 2007, Section 3 of the National Statement has addressed ethical considerations specific to research methods or fields. The 2018 revision provides a new structure for Section 3, based on the elements of a research project (from conception to post-completion). The revised Section 3 begins with a chapter that addresses ethical issues in all research, followed by specialised guidance for research involving human biospecimens, genomics and xenotransplantation.

This approach emphasises that researchers, Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) and other users of the National Statement must take account of the principles and major themes in research ethics addressed in Sections 1 and 2 of the document as the foundation of the guidance in Section 3 and then, in turn, consider the guidance provided in Chapter 3.1 as a base for the guidance provided in the other chapters included in this section.

While significant changes have been made to all aspects of the guidance provided in Section 3, we note, in particular, the additional guidance that has been provided in relation to collection, use and management of data and information and to management of the findings or results arising from genomic research.

As part of this update, changes have also been made to Chapters 5.1, 5.2 and 5.5 in Section 5, the Glossary and the Index as a consequence of the revisions to Section 3.

Revisions to the National Statement were informed by working committees and through public consultation in accordance with requirements of the National Health and Medical Research Council Act 1992.

Currency and effective date

All users of the National Statement, including HRECs, research offices and researchers are expected to ensure that the current version of the National Statement is being used in developing research proposals, making submissions for ethics review and undertaking ethics review. However, as a consequence of the scope of the revisions to Section 3, we expect that users of the National Statement will gradually integrate these revisions into their proposals, submissions and review over the period from July to December 2018, with full implementation expected by 1 January 2019.

This timeline is intended to give researchers and HRECs an opportunity to familiarise themselves with the new guidance prior to the revocation of the version of the National Statement updated, most recently, in 2015. To facilitate this transition, both the current version of the National Statement and the updated version are available on the NHMRC website at http://nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines/publications/e72.

Use of the National Statement is also linked to the Human Research Ethics Application (HREA), released in December 2016 to replace the National Ethics Application Form.

To coincide with the release of the revised National Statement, questions in the HREA will require revision and users of the HREA will be advised when the revised HREA is online.

Institutions and HRECs are encouraged to allow a transition period for researchers while the revisions to the HREA take effect. The provision of a transition period, how it will be managed and its timeframe are at the discretion of individual Institutions/HRECs.

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Context

Australia’s research integrity framework is underpinned by three national standards developed by NHMRC and its co-authors, the Australian Research Council (ARC) and Universities Australia (UA). Together these three standards provide guidance on responsible and ethical research conduct for both humans and animals.

The overarching document is the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research, 2018. The Code is the leading reference for researchers and institutions across all disciplines about the expectations for responsible research conduct and the handling of investigations into research misconduct. After 10 years in operation, the Code has been reviewed and the 2018 edition was released in June 2018. The other two documents are the National Statement and the Australian code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes (also endorsed by CSIRO).


INTERVIEW

AHRECS (While we know it predated the recent work on s3) What drove the decision to conduct a rolling review, rather than a review of the entire document?

NHMRC During the revision of the National Statement that was completed in 2007, it was determined that a more flexible, more efficient approach to revising the document would be a good innovation. We wanted to be able to both respond to the needs of users for more limited changes – from a word, to a paragraph, to a single chapter – without having to review the whole document and to be able to integrate or modify the content in response to changes nationally or internationally in research, research ethics or government regulation. Review of the 1999 National Statement took three years from start to finish and we thought we could improve on that timeline! We have found that this approach has, in practice, enabled us to make both minor changes and significant changes to single chapters of the document, as well as to review one of the five sections of the document, as we have just done.

AHRECS Are there downsides to that approach?

NHMRC Yes, there are. The major downside is that the document is ‘of a piece’ and changes to any one part of the document invariably require consideration of changes to the other parts, not just in terms of cross-referencing, but in terms of the content itself. This issue of ‘consequential effect’ manifests itself in the need to ensure consistency in our guidance and to consider the impact on the whole document of more philosophical or conceptual changes that have been introduced by the changes. An example in the most recent revision of Section 3 is that our approach to interventional research in Section 3 had a ‘flow on’ effect to Section 5 in terms of where certain guidance belonged, how that guidance should reflect changes in the clinical research sector since 2007 and how it should reflect other guidance documents (e.g. related to safety reporting) that NHMRC has published in the last 12 months.

AHRECS What were you hoping to accomplish with the changes to section 3 (and Section 5 + the Glossary)? Was it achieved?

NHMRC Principally, we were hoping to facilitate a re-thinking on the part of users (researchers and HRECs, primarily) regarding how they conceptualise and address ethical issues in the design, review and conduct of the research. We began with a decision to abandon the idea of ‘categories’ or ‘types’ of research as the main way to package this guidance and to focus on the reality that most ethics guidance applies to ALL research, thereby requiring ALL researchers to consider it, rather than just going to their specialised chapter of the document and, potentially, ignoring the broader issues. We then settled on the ‘life cycle’ of a research project as the best structure – that is, from conception to post-completion stages of a research project. This also enabled us to see more clearly what was not general guidance and encapsulate that extra guidance in separate, specialised chapters that each required consideration of the general guidance as a prerequisite to fully understanding and implementing the specialised guidance content.

The changes that we made to Section 5 and the Glossary were a direct consequence of the revision of Section 3 and we purposefully did not introduce changes to those parts of the document that were independent of the Section 3 revision, even though it was pretty tempting to do so sometimes.

We do think that we achieved our objectives and we are very satisfied with the results of the review process.

AHRECS If you could say just one thing about the work to date what it be?

NHMRC Review of the National Statement, while challenging, involves very stimulating and satisfying dialogue with lots of researchers, reviewers and other users of the document. We are so committed to it that we are almost immediately taking on the review of Section 4 and Section 5 – so, watch this space!

AHRECS When someone says they would have liked examples to better illustrate the new concepts in the update how do you respond?

NHMRC A weaselly response would be: it depends on which new concepts you are talking about; but, to use one example, a good look at Chapter 3.3: Genomic research and the Decision tree for the management of findings in genomic research and health care that we included (on page 52) to address this complex issue provides just such an attempt to illustrate by example. The main impediment to using examples or case studies to illustrate concepts is the difficulty of deciding which concepts to illustrate and with how many examples, as well as potentially expanding the size of the document exponentially in order to do the examples justice.

AHRECS When will a html version be available online?

At present, the 2007 version of the National Statement (updated May 2015) is available in both PDF and HTML format; whereas the version updated 2018 is only available in PDF. We are not 100% sure when the HTML version of the National Statement (updated 2018) will be available, but we anticipate within the next two to three months. Please also note that the current address (https://beta.nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/national-statement-ethical-conduct-human-research-2007-updated-2018#block-views-block-file-attachments-content-block-1) is only temporary, which means that you’ll need to update your bookmarks/links again when the final version of the new NHMRC website is released in late August or early September.


 

This post may be cited as:
NHMRC (31 July 2018) Release of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research 2007 (updated 2018). Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/release-of-the-national-statement-on-ethical-conduct-in-human-research-2007-updated-2018-with-interview

We invite debate on issues raised by items we publish. However, we will only publish debate about the issues that the items raise and expect that all contributors model ethical and respectful practice.

Ethical research with young children: Whose research, whose agenda?0

 

The last decade has seen increased global focus on research with young children within and across a range of disciplines (Farrell, 2016). The period, birth to age eight years, known colloquially as the ‘early years’ or ‘early childhood’, has been conceptualized as pivotal to young children’s current wellbeing and future life chances and, in turn, the increasing focus of research within the disciplines of education, health, human services, developmental science, law, economics and neuroscience. New theoretical perspectives, expanded methodological approaches and fresh lines of inquiry are being brought to bear on the ethical design, conduct and dissemination of early childhood research (Kagan, Tisdall & Farrell, 2016). The global focus on ethical research with young children has been prefaced, to some extent, by global recognition of the rights of children to participation and protection in everyday activities (Tisdall, 2012). Despite the focus on children and their rights, child research is largely an adult enterprise serving adult-driven agendas, albeit driven by genuine adult concern for children’s rights to participation and protection. On the one hand, it is driven by the imperative to protect children, quite rightly, from risk of harm, often drawing upon normative views of child development and young children’s pre-competence or developmental incapacity to consent to, participate in or withdraw from research. On the other hand, there is a growing quest to listen to and consult with children as competent and active research participants, while still enacting protective ethical obligations towards them (Alderson & Morrow, 2011). While much child research claims to be with children rather than on, for or about children, the enterprise is typically driven by the agendas of research productivity, performativity and empirical leverage of research within policy and provision for young children – by and for adults. The upshot is that some children, families and communities increasingly experience the over-burden of research, their demographic characteristics making them prime sites for research and their participation essential for attaining research targets and outputs. The enterprise of ethical research with children calls for ethical consideration of the adult performance-driven agendas that drive much child research. It calls for consideration of the agency and active participation of children, families in communities in ways that respect their decision to engage in the research and greater affordances of co-constructed research for children and adults than is currently the case.

References

Alderson, P., & Morrow, V. (2011). The ethics of research with children and young people. A practical handbook (2nd Ed).London: Sage.

Farrell, A. (2016). Ethics in early childhood research. In A. Farrell, S.L. Kagan & E.K.M. Tisdall (Eds.), Sage handbook of early childhood research (pp. 163-184). London: Sage.

Kagan, S.L., Tisdall, E.K.M., & Farrell, A. (2016). Future directions in early childhood research: Addressing next-step imperatives, In A. Farrell, S.L. Kagan & E.K.M. Tisdall (Eds.), Sage handbook of early childhood research (pp. 517-534). London: Sage.

Tisdall, E.K.M, (2012). Taking forward child and young people’s participation. In M Hill, G. Head, A. Lockyer, B. Reid & R. Taylor (Ed), Children’s services: Working together (pp.151-162). Harlow: Pearson.

Contributor
Professor Ann Farrell
Head, School of Early childhood and Inclusive Education
Faculty of Education Queensland University of Technology
QUT staff page a.farrell@qut.edu.au

 

This post may be cited as:
Farrell A. (2017, 23 October 2017) Ethical research with young children: Whose research, whose agenda? Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/ethical-research-young-children-whose-research-whose-agenda

A Model for the Participation of Indigenous Children and Young People in Research0

 

Following my September 2017 piece: Ethics and the Participation of Indigenous Children and Young People in Research, this article briefly overviews the research model I developed in my PhD. The model is based on a children’s rights-based approach (CRBA) to research informed by Indigenous research methodologies. It combines Laura Lundy’s[1] analysis of Article 12 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) with aspects of Indigenous research methodologies articulated by Ray (Indigenous convergence methodology)[2] and Nakata (Indigenous standpoint theory).[3] The field research methods sought to engage with children and young people in a culturally appropriate and child friendly way by using Bessarab and Ng’andu’s[4] ‘yarning’ approach, as well as a range of other child friendly and play based methods such as drawing, modelling with playdough, as well as photography and peer-to-peer video interviewing using iPads[5].

Lundy’s diagram below highlights the interpretation of Article 12 of the CRC adopted in the research. This interpretation emphasises that Article 12 requires governments to ensure children and young people not only have the opportunity to voice their views about matters affecting them, but that their views are taken into consideration and influence the decisions that are made.

Lundy’s Conceptualisation of Article 12[6]

The child rights-based model used prioritised child-centred play in the research process and engaged with children, rather than doing research on or about children[7]. Some of these interactions are depicted below in the photographs.

10-Year-Old Child Modelling Something that is Important to Him—‘My Family’[8]

10-Year-Old Child Modelling Something that is Important to Him—‘I Like Toys, and Robots … and Dreamtime and Culture Dance’[9]

Experimental Photography, Testing the Functionality of the iPads [10]

Making an iPad Video [11]

Taking part in social research can expose Indigenous children and young people to varying degrees of risk however ‘the line between gate-keeping intended for the protection of participants and their communities and the risk of sliding into paternalism is a thin one.’[12] Research that is carried out in an ethically robust, age appropriate and culturally sensitive way can present avenues for Indigenous children and young people to express their views and have these views taken into consideration in accordance with Article 12 of the CRC.

This research suggests Indigenous children and young people are ready, willing and able to voice their perspectives about matters affecting them, if given the opportunity in appropriate circumstances and in an appropriate setting. The findings of this research debunk conceptualisations of Indigenous children and young people as passive and vulnerable. The implications of viewing and defining Indigenous children and young people in this way limits their civic participation and reduces opportunities for their voice to be heard about matters affecting them.

A children’s rights-based approach to research positions children and young people as empowered co-researchers, with expertise and valuable perspectives capable of leading and informing the research process. It is an approach which engages children and young people in research in a collaborative way that fulfils, promotes and protects a range of rights provided for by the CRC, in particular, their rights to participate in decision making processes.

For more information about the research model see Doel-Mackaway, Holly, ‘I think it’s Okay … But it’s Racist, it’s Bad Racism’: Aboriginal Children and Young People’s Views about the Intervention’ (2017) 43(1) Monash University Law Review 76.

In 2018 Routledge is publishing a book about this PhD research.

References

Barker, John and Susie Weller, ‘“Is It Fun?” Developing Children Centred Research Methods’ (2003) 23(1/2) International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 33.

Bat, Melodie et al, ‘Ethical Moves: Innovation in Qualitative Research: An Example of an Ethical and Effective Cross-Cultural Research Methodology Using Video’ (Paper presented at the AARE Annual Conference, Canberra, 2009);

Bessarab, Dawn and Bridget Ng’andu, ‘Yarning about Yarning as a Legitimate Method in Indigenous Research’ (2010) 3(1) International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies 37.

Coram, Stella, ‘Rethinking Indigenous Research Approval: The Perspective of a “Stranger”’ (2011) 11(2) Qualitative Research Journal 38.

Kral, Inge (2010) ‘Plugged In: Remote Australian Indigenous Youth and Digital Culture’ (Working Paper No 69/2010, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, May 2010). http://caepr.anu.edu.au/Publications/WP/2010WP69.php

Lundy, Laura, ‘“Voice” Is Not Enough: Conceptualising Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child’ (2007) 33 British Educational Research Journal 927.

Nakata, Martin, Disciplining the Savages: Savaging the Disciplines (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2007), chapter 11.

Ray, Lana, ‘Deciphering the “Indigenous” in Indigenous Methodologies’ (2012) 8(1) AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 85, 88, 88. See also Lester-Irabinna Rigney, ‘Indigenist Research and Aboriginal Australia’ in Julian Kunnie and Nomalungelo Ivy Goduka (eds), Indigenous Peoples’ Wisdom and Power: Affirming Our Knowledge Through Narratives (Ashgate Publishing, 2006) 32.

Contributor
Dr Holly Doel-Mackaway | Lecturer | Macquarie Law School |
Dr Doel-Mackaway’s Macquarie staff page | holly.doel-mackaway@mq.edu.au

This post may be cited as:
Doel-Mackaway H. (2017, 20 October 2017) A Model for the Participation of Indigenous Children and Young People in Research Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/model-participation-indigenous-children-young-people-research

Footnotes

[1]Laura Lundy, ‘“Voice” Is Not Enough: Conceptualising Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child’ (2007) 33 British Educational Research Journal 927.
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[2]Lana Ray, ‘Deciphering the “Indigenous” in Indigenous Methodologies’ (2012) 8(1) AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 85, 88, 88. See also Lester-Irabinna Rigney, ‘Indigenist Research and Aboriginal Australia’ in Julian Kunnie and Nomalungelo Ivy Goduka (eds), Indigenous Peoples’ Wisdom and Power: Affirming Our Knowledge Through Narratives (Ashgate Publishing, 2006) 32.
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[3]Martin Nakata, Disciplining the Savages: Savaging the Disciplines (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2007), chapter 11
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[4]Dawn Bessarab and Bridget Ng’andu, ‘Yarning about Yarning as a Legitimate Method in Indigenous Research’ (2010) 3(1) International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies 37.
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[5]Melodie Bat et al, ‘Ethical Moves: Innovation in Qualitative Research: An Example of an Ethical and Effective Cross-Cultural Research Methodology Using Video’ (Paper presented at the AARE Annual Conference, Canberra, 2009); Inge Kral, ‘Plugged In: Remote Australian Indigenous Youth and Digital Culture’ (Working Paper No 69/2010, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, May 2010).
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[6] Laura Lundy, ‘“Voice” is Not Enough: Conceptualising Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child’ (2007) 33(6) British Educational Research Journal 927, 932
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[7]John Barker and Susie Weller, ‘“Is It Fun?” Developing Children Centred Research Methods’ (2003) 23(1/2) International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 33, 33.
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[8]10-year-old male, Primary Class Group Discussion, Field Research Session 1 (of 4) (Northern Territory, 13 May 2014).
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[9] 10-year-old male, Primary Class Group Discussion, Field Research Session 1 (of 4) (Northern Territory, 13 May 2014).
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[10]14-year-old male, Secondary Class Group Discussion, Field Research Session 3 (of 4) (Northern Territory, 20 May 2014).
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[11] 10-year-old male, Primary Class Group Discussion, Field Research Session 1 (of 4) (Northern Territory, 13 May 2014
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[12]Stella Coram, ‘Rethinking Indigenous Research Approval: The Perspective of a “Stranger”’ (2011) 11(2) Qualitative Research Journal 38, 45.

Ethics and the Participation of Indigenous Children and Young People in Research0

 

Indigenous children and young people’s participation in social research raises a range of ethical issues that researchers and participants must grapple with prior to and throughout the research process. These issues include for example, matters to do with protocols for seeking consent, ensuring the research process is culturally respectful and age appropriate, whether the research environment and methods used are child friendly and participants can freely express their views, and ensuring the research endeavour is mutually beneficial.

In Australia, all research involving Indigenous children and young people must be guided by, and adhere to the principles articulated in the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (‘National Statement’), particularly chapter 4.2 of that Statement. If the research is health related it must comply with the National Health and Medical Research Council’s Values and Ethics: Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research (‘NHMRC Values and Ethics Guidelines’). These documents instruct researchers about how to undertake research in an ethically sound manner, and the principles they contain are fundamental to the manner in which Australian ethics committees assess human research applications. Additionally, the Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (‘AIATSIS Guidelines’) are particularly instructive and helpful and are becoming more widely used by researchers and ethics committees alike.

There is a gap however, in relation to a comprehensive ethical framework for the involvement of Indigenous children and young people in social research. The National Statement communicates the ethical parameters for the involvement of children in research; and the NHMRC Values and Ethics Guidelines and the AIATSIS Guidelines set out a framework for the involvement of Indigenous people in research. The National Statement specifically refers to research relating to children and young people, but does not mention research relating to Indigenous children and young people; and there is no mention of children or young people in either the NHMRC Values and Ethics Guidelines nor the AIATSIS Guidelines. Thus, in Australia there is no single overarching ethical framework that specifically pertains to the involvement of Indigenous children and young people in research. Read together however, these three documents provide a firm basis upon which to develop and assess the breadth of ethical considerations regarding the involvement of Indigenous children and young people in research, particularly when read in conjunction with the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

There is much to say about the CRC and the UNDRIP in relation to Indigenous children and young people’s participation in research. All research endeavours involving children and young people must uphold the comprehensive body of children’s rights set out in the CRC. These rights are numerous, therefore the task of ensuring compliance with the CRC for child related research may at first instance appear overwhelming for researchers. One vital provision in the CRC is worthy of focused attention. This is the principle articulated in article 12—children’s right to participate in ‘all matters affecting’ them. This is an instructive and appropriate starting point for researchers to base their considerations of how a research process can adhere to children’s rights principles, and in doing so create a child friendly, culturally respectful and age appropriate research environment that reduces risks participants may experience as a result of taking part in the research. Article 12 of the CRC provides that:

States Parties shall assure to the child who is capable of forming his or her own views the right to express those views freely in all matters affecting the child, the views of the child being given due weight in accordance with the age and maturity of the child.

Article 12 aligns well with the ethical considerations specific to children and young people outlined in chapter 4.2 of the National Statement. Article 12 is widely accepted as the ‘lynchpin’ of the CRC, and a foundational right upon which other rights depend and emerge. The Committee responsible for overseeing the global implementation of the CRC makes this clear when they said article 12 ‘establishes not only a right in itself, but should also be considered in the interpretation and implementation of all other rights.’

The language of this provision is strong. Note the use of compelling words such as ‘shall assure’ emphasising children’s right to free expression, and the all-encompassing subject matter to which the provision applies, namely to ‘all matters affecting’ them. These words are emphatic and when they came into force this drastically altered the pre-CRC, and post CRC, rights framework for children globally.

Involving Indigenous children and young people in research processes, particularly by non-Indigenous researchers, must be carried out in accordance with national guidelines, and in a way that upholds participant’s rights as children in accordance with the CRC, as well as their rights as Indigenous peoples in line with the UNDRIP.

In the absence of a comprehensive and unified ethical framework for engaging Indigenous children and young people in research I developed a model and detailed this in my PhD as well as in the Monash University Law Review. This model is a child rights-based approach informed by Indigenous research methodologies that uses child friendly and culturally sensitive research methods: yarning and peer-to-peer video interviewing to engage children and young people in research. This model is based on national ethics guidelines, the provisions set out in the CRC and UNDRIP, and draws on current scholarship in the area. The development of this model contributes to enhancing the ethical framework that regulates and guides the participation of Indigenous children and young people in social research.

References

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (2nd revised ed, 2012)

Bessarab, Dawn and Bridget Ng’andu, ‘Yarning About Yarning as a Legitimate Method in Indigenous Research’ (2010) 3(1) Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies 37

Convention on the Rights of the Child opened for signature 20 November 1989, 44 UNTS 25 (entered into force 2 September 1990)

Doel-Mackaway, Holly, ‘“I think it’s Okay … But it’s Racist, it’s Bad Racism”: Aboriginal Children and Young People’s Views about the Intervention’ (2017) 43(1) Monash University Law Review (forthcoming Sept, 2017)

Freeman, Michael, ‘Whither Children: Protection, Participation, Autonomy?’ (1994) 22(3) Manitoba Law Journal 307

National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian Research Council and the Australian Vice-Chancellors’ Committee, ‘National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research’ (2007, updated December 2013)

National Health and Medical Research Council, Values and Ethics: Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research (Commonwealth of Australia, 2003)

UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No 12, ‘The Right of the Child to be Heard,’ UN Doc CRC/C/GC/12 (1 July 2009)

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, GA Res 61/295, UN GAOR, 61st sess, 107th plen mtg, Supp No 49, UN Doc A/RES/61/295 (13 September 2007)

Contributor
Dr Holly Doel-Mackaway | Lecturer | Macquarie Law School | Dr Doel-Mackaway’s Macquarie staff pageholly.doel-mackaway@mq.edu.au

This post may be cited as:
Doel-Mackaway H. (2017, 21 September 2017) Ethics and the Participation of Indigenous Children and Young People in Research Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/ethics-participation-indigenous-children-young-people-research

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