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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Making Indigenous research ethics a compulsory facet of supervisor development and student training1

 

There is an increasing trend in Australian universities to provide professional development for supervisors of higher degree research (HDR) students (Whisker & Kiley, 2014). Concurrently there is also a move toward more structured research development programs for HDR candidates (McGagh et.al., 2016). Education in Indigenous research ethics for both these groups is essential if we are to ensure that research with Indigenous Australian peoples and communities is ethical. Particularly in relation to nonmaleficence and beneficence; key aspects underlined by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and the National Health & Medical Research Council guidelines on Indigenous research. Although it is difficult to quantify, given the lack of an explicit research codes for much Indigenous research, even a cursory look at outcomes of major competitive grants schemes suggests that there is considerable research being undertaken in Indigenous communities by both Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers. Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) procedures provide both guidance to researchers and a buffer to communities through the mechanism of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ‘appendix’ which ensures that researchers address the key issues of harm, consent and benefit. However, the HRECs should not have sole responsibility in this area.

This is not to say that HRECs do not have a role in this area, but we suggest that HREC responsibility needs to be part an integrated educative framework of Indigenous research development for both HDR students, their supervisors and indeed any researcher undertaking Indigenous research (Trudgett, 2011, Trudgett et.al., 2016). We suggest that Graduate Research Schools and those responsible for education and ongoing development of supervisors and HDR students need to prioritise this area of research education. In our experience, this work is too often ad hoc and left to Indigenous academics who are, in some cases, called on to provide expert advice without appropriate recognition in terms of being a formal part of supervision teams or being part of their usual academic roles. While there continues to be significant under-representation of Indigenous academics working in Australian universities (Behrendt, et.al., 2012), the need for this advisory work can be frustrating for supervisors seeking advice from a limited pool and even more so, for Indigenous academics who are already burdened by considerable unrecognised work (Page & Asmar, 2008).

On a more positive note there are increasing numbers of more senior Indigenous academics who can contribute to this area of universities work. At our own institution, our team from the Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges, regularly provide education for HDR students and their supervisors as part of the UTS Graduate Research School’s structured researcher development program. In the context of the ACOLA Review and the recent Universities Australian draft Indigenous Strategy (Universities Australia, 2016) which indicates that universities should take steps to increase the numbers of Indigenous HDR students, the need for improved capacity in Indigenous research and ethics is clear. It is imperative that Graduate Research Schools and those responsible for research training take steps to actively address this issue. To conclude, universities need to dedicate appropriate resources to the development of supervisors responsible for overseeing the candidature of Indigenous and non-Indigenous postgraduate students undertaking Indigenous research and avoid delegating such responsibility to their existing Indigenous staff without additional resources and acknowledgement.

References

Behrendt, L., Larkin, S., Griew, R., & Kelly, P. (2012). Review of higher education access and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Final Report. Canberra: Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education.

McGagh, J, Marsh, H, Western, M, Thomas, P, Hastings, A, Mihailova, M, Wenham, M (2016) Review of Australia’s Research Training System. Report for the Australian Council of Learned Academies, www.acola.org.au.

Page, S. & Asmar, C. (2008) ‘Beneath the teaching iceberg: Exposing the hidden support dimensions of Indigenous academic work.’ Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, Vol 37S, pp. 109-117.

Trudgett, M. (2011). Western places, academic spaces and Indigenous faces: supervising Indigenous Australian postgraduate students. Teaching in Higher Education, 16(4), 389-399.

Trudgett, M., Page, S., & Harrison, N. (2016). Brilliant Minds: A Snapshot of Successful Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 45(1), 70-79.

Universities Australia. (2016). Indigenous Strategy 2017 – 20120, Draft for consultation, November, 2016, circulated to universities, 17/11/16.

Wisker, G., & Kiley, M. (2014). Professional learning: lessons for supervision from doctoral examining. International Journal for Academic Development, 19(2), 125-138.

Contributors
Susan Page – Susan.page@uts.edu.au | CAIK profile
Michelle Trudgett – Michelle.trudgett@uts.edu.au | CAIK profile

Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges, University of Technology Sydney. http://www.uts.edu.au/research-and-teaching/our-research/centre-advancement-indigenous-knowledges

This post may be cited as:
Page S andTrudgett M. (2016, 25 November) Making Indigenous research ethics a compulsory facet of supervisor development and student training. Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/making-indigenous-research-ethics-compulsory-facet-supervisor-development-student-training

Abuse of prisoners in the United States0

 

Mike Adorjan and Rose Ricciardelli’s edited collection, Engaging with Ethics in International Criminological Research, was recently published by Routledge. Of course, the book examines the likely suspects – ethical practices in relation to studies of policing, imprisonment and vulnerable populations. However, there are more unusual pieces on illuminating the Dark Net, carceral tours, and working in Hong Kong and China. My own contribution (Israel, 2016) examined the sad history of abuse of consent in research involving prisoners and prisons in the United States. It is an account of the exploitation of prisoners and a failure of criminologists to have any impact on the regulation and review of prison-based research.

Consent procedures have been created by research ethics regulators to protect research participants from abuse. In the United States, prisoners have been particularly vulnerable to the exploitative practices of researchers. However, contemporary consent procedures also stop researchers from uncovering institutional practices that exploit non-autonomous individuals. In doing so, research ethics regulation forms part of a broader strategy of self-protection established by public and private correctional services. Some scholars outside the United States have used covert research to evade prison protectionism. However, few have sought to link criminology’s understanding of state and state-corporate violence to the abuse of prisoners by researchers or extend their critique of protectionism to the work of research ethics regulators… I explore how requirements to obtain consent have been systematically evaded within prison-based research in the United States to the detriment of prisoners, but also how responses to scandal have led to the overprotection of institutions at the expense of prisoners’ ability to exercise autonomy, access justice, and benefit from the research process. Sadly, this chapter also demonstrates the apparent irrelevance of criminologists to the reform of regulation of research ethics in American prisons.

References

Israel, M (2016) A Short History of Coercive Practices: the Abuse of Consent in Research involving Prisoners and Prisons in the United States, in Adorjan, M and Ricciardelli, R (eds) Engaging with Ethics in International Criminological Research. London: Routledge. pp69-86. https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138938403

Contributor
Mark Israel is a senior consultant with AHRECS, adjunct professor of law and criminology at Flinders University and a visiting academic at The University of Western Australia.

This post may be cited as:
Israel M. (2016, 19 September) Abuse of prisoners in the United States. Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/abuse-prisoners-united-states

Applying Place to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence Training0

 

In the 1990s, I worked with many community groups and Native American/African-American communities on the difficult challenges of understanding environmental health risks from low-level radiation contamination. These place-based communities and cultural groups were downwind from nuclear weapons production facilities which had massive deliberate and accidental releases of radiation since their operations began during and after World War II. In the health organizing work I had conducted, I was not aware of the potential of research ethics guidelines to bring more beneficence and protection to these populations and their geographic communities. Soon after formal ethical investigations produced findings of cultural ignorance and a lack of knowledge of research ethics by many researchers involved with human radiation experiments, I decided to pursue doctoral studies to promote ethical protections for place-based communities. After receiving my PhD and doing some extensive studies of bioethical principles and their potential to be applied to groups/communities and place, I have been able to publish new studies/practices in this area. With much support both from National Institute for Health and the National Science Foundation and their grant programs on research ethics training, I have worked with several collaborators to promote research ethics training for graduate students in environmental health/sciences, natural resource sciences and engineering (Quigley et al 2015, see NEEP website http://www.brown.edu/research/research-ethics/neep).

In this blog, I provide a discussion of human subjects protections being extended to the protection of the spatial setting, the place-based identities and meanings of individual and group human subjects in their local communities. In a recent paper (Quigley 2016), I argued for this protection both from recommendations that already exist in bioethical guidelines (National Bioethics Advisory Committee (NBAC) and Council for the International Organization of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) and from field studies that demonstrate important lessons for protection of place and place-based identities. The bioethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, respect for persons/respect for communities and justice are reviewed in this article with detailed guidance about each principle as it relates to protecting place and place-based identities.

  • Regulatory guidance exists in terms of the need for researchers to provide benefits to researched populations, to reduce exploitation particularly to racial/cultural and resource-poor groups who are vulnerable subjects, and to allow community consultation on the risks and benefits of research designs. Many resource-poor and politically powerless communities are directly dependent on the subsistence resources of their local spatial settings. Research interventions should not harm these conditions but instead produce beneficial change. Reasonably available benefits should be determined with local representatives (health care providers, community representatives, advocacy groups, scientists and government officials). Such consultation will help to reduce harms, particularly relevant to indigenous groups when the social risks of research can cause disrespect of cultural beliefs, traditions, world views, the violation of local protocols, social stigmatization, and discriminatory harms. For example, in studies of landscape planning, academic researchers co-collaborated with Native community leaders to adopt community-based designs on walking/bike paths, community gardens, mixed use and conservation with housing needs (Thering 2011). Dangles et al (2010) worked with community consultation to ensure that environmental monitoring for control of pests in Andean potato farming and for climate and soil conditions was conducted with community members and particularly with the youth who received training on monitoring technologies which helped to improve youth training opportunities and reduce youth migration. With community collaboration, local community-based benefits can be identified and integrated into technical research plans to improve beneficence.

, I have described how research interventions with cultural groups do require a deep study and practice of an “environmental” cultural competence by researchers, particularly for place-based identities, meanings and past conditions (Quigley 2016b).

There are abundant field studies on new participatory approaches to field research with local communities (see Bibliographies on NEEP website), many of which incorporate collaborative learning about place-based meanings which then lead to research designs which produce local benefits along with technical research activities (capacity-building, skills development, youth outreach, access to critical services, local knowledge guidance about local conditions/resources) These community-based and culturally-competent interventions help to promote the “justice” principle, achieving fair representation, recruitment and fair benefits/burdens for these place-based settings. IRBs are learning more about social risks and community-based protections to ensure more fair treatment, fair benefits and to reduce unintended harms to researched communities.

References

Quigley, D. D. Sonnenfeld, P. Brown, L. Silka, Q. Tian. L. He. Research Ethics Training on Place-based Communities and Cultural Groups. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, DOI 10.1007/s13412-015-0236-x , published online, March 29, 2015.

Quigley, D. (2016a) Applying Place to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence/Humility Training. Journal of Academic Ethics, published online 13 January, Springer

Quigley, D. (2016b) “Building Cultural Competence in Environmental Studies and Natural Resource Sciences”. Society and Natural Resources, 29:6, 725-737.

Contributor
Dianne Quigley, PhD is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Brown University’s Science and Technology Studies Program and can be contacted at Dianne_Quigley_1@brown.edu

This post may be cited as:
Quigley D. (2016, 22 August) Applying Place to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence Training.Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/applying-place-research-ethics-cultural-competence-training

Technology research in sensitive settings: A workshop on ethical encounters in HCI1

 

In May this year, a group of researchers gathered in San Jose, California, to attend a workshop on “Ethical Encounters in HCI”. HCI is human-computer interaction, an interdisciplinary field of research that covers a broad spectrum of activities, ranging from ethnographic research that aims to understand people to inform design, to lab-based studies that aim to develop and evaluate new technologies.

Why worry about ethics in HCI?

The field of human-computer interaction emerged in the 1980s, when personal computing was in its infancy. This was a time when computers sat on desktops, usually in the workplace. Initially, the aim of this nascent field of research was to create usable and efficient systems that supported people’s work activities. Much of the work in HCI at the time was conducted in laboratory settings or the workplace, with an emphasis on reducing errors and improving efficiency as people – or ‘users’ – learnt to perform tasks using computers.

Fastforward 30-plus years and computing has moved off the desktop and expanded into every realm of our lives. HCI, too, has expanded. No longer confined to the office or laboratory, HCI research has moved into the home and beyond, into settings where doing “ethical research” means more than getting your participants to sign a consent form (Bruckman, 2014). It is not unusual now for HCI researchers to conduct fieldwork in places like hospitals, schools, and residential care facilities, and to work closely with participants who might be considered vulnerable, such as people experiencing homelessness, chronic illness, or recent bereavement. Research in these settings can be rewarding and valuable, but also fraught with concerns about how to ensure the research is conducted in an ethical manner. In these settings, we can’t always predict and plan for every contingency, and there is not always a clear right or wrong way to proceed when researchers encounter a dilemma (Munteanu et al, 2015). In addition, HCI research might involve not only working closely with people to understand their lives, but also designing and implementing new technologies. We cannot always predict the impact these technologies will have on people’s lives and we have to be especially mindful of the possibility of unexpected negative effects when working in sensitive settings (Waycott et al, 2015). Social media, too, has highlighted the complexity of ethics in HCI and technology research; many researchers are now using publicly available social media posts as research data, sometimes to explore sensitive topics.

Workshop outcomes

With these challenges in mind, we gathered in San Jose to discuss the common ethical issues people have faced when doing this research and to explore possible ways of addressing these issues in the future. The workshop, held as part of the International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), brought together HCI researchers working in sensitive and difficult settings who wanted to communally reflect on ethical issues they had encountered in their work.

Participants included a PhD student working on designing information systems for families of children in palliative care, researchers whose work aims to preserve the “voices from the Rwanda trial” in post-genocide Rwanda, and crisis informatics researchers who analysed Twitter posts to understand the role of social media during Hurricane Sandy. Prior to the workshop, participants submitted position papers describing their “ethical encounters”, available here: https://ethicalencountershci.wordpress.com/chi-2016/position-papers-chi-2016/

The workshop aimed to provide these researchers with an opportunity to discuss the challenges they have faced, and to brainstorm potential “solutions” and ideas that might help HCI researchers navigate ethical issues in the future. Challenges included:

  • tensions between meeting institutional ethics review requirements and managing situational ethical issues that emerge during fieldwork;
  • managing both participants’ and researchers’ vulnerability and wellbeing;
  • the temporal nature of consent (should consent be a one-off procedure, or something that we revisit throughout the research process?);
  • managing participant and stakeholder expectations about the technologies we design and introduce;
  • deciding what happens at the end of the project, and managing expectations around this;
  • working with stakeholders, gatekeepers, organizations, and being aware of inter-organizational politics;
  • deciding who gets to participate and who doesn’t; and
  • dealing with sensitive (yet public) data that can trigger difficult responses for researchers, participants, and others exposed to the research

These challenges can occur in any research that involves fieldwork in sensitive settings; but they can be exacerbated in HCI because researchers in this field may not have been trained in dealing with these issues, and because designing and introducing technology into these settings adds a layer of complexity to the research.

The workshop participants identified a number of ways of providing support to HCI researchers in the future. Suggestions included looking to other disciplines (e.g., anthropology, sociology) to see what lessons we can take from them; gathering together resources and cases from previous projects (e.g., building a database of consent forms and other documents); and developing a professional advisory group to provide guidance and to promote consideration of research ethics within the HCI community. Some of these suggestions are already being achieved through initiatives like AHRECS.

References

Bruckman, A. (2014). Research Ethics and HCI. In J. S. Olson and W. A. Kellogg (Eds). Ways of Knowing in HCI. Springer

Munteanu, C., Molyneaux, H., Moncur, W., Romero, M., O’Donnell, S., & Vines, J. (2015). Situational ethics: Re-thinking approaches to formal ethics requirements for human-computer interaction Proc. CHI 2015 (pp. 105-114): ACM Press.

Waycott, J., Wadley, G., Schutt, S., Stabolidis, A., & Lederman, R. (2015). The challenge of technology research in ‘sensitive HCI’. Paper presented at the OzCHI 2015, Melbourne, Australia.

Workshop information:

https://ethicalencountershci.wordpress.com/

Waycott, J., Munteanu, C., Davis, H., Thieme, A., Moncur, W., McNaney, R., . . . Branham, S. (2016). Ethical Encounters in Human-Computer Interaction. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Contributor
Jenny Waycott is a Lecturer in the Department of Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne. After completing her PhD at the Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University UK, Dr Waycott has worked on several projects in the fields of human-computer interaction and educational technology. Her research is broadly concerned with understanding the role technologies play in people’s learning, work, and social activities. Her recent work has focused on the design and use of social technologies for/with older adults, ethical issues in the design and use of new technologies in sensitive settings, creative uses of new technologies for social inclusion, and the use of social technologies in higher education. For more information see: http://www.jwaycott.com/
jwaycott@unimelb.edu.au

This post may be cited as:
Waycott J. (2016, 29 July) Technology research in sensitive settings: A workshop on ethical encounters in HCI’. Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/technology-research-sensitive-settings-workshop-ethical-encounters-hci

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