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Karen L Martin

Karen L Martin

AHRECS Consultant

Biography

Dr Karen Martin is a Noonuccal woman from Minjerripah (North Stradbroke Island – south east Queensland) and also has Bidjara ancestry (central Queensland). She has some 20 years of experience in higher education, lecturing and researching in: Education; Aboriginal education; Early childhood education; Aboriginal studies and Aboriginal worldview and knowledge.

She was awarded the James Cook University Medal (2007) and the AARE Doctoral Dissertation Award (2007) for her PhD titled: ‘Please knock before you enter: Aboriginal regulation of Outsiders and the implications for researchers’. This work is used in many post-graduate degree programs in Australia. Karen is often invited to present on Aboriginal research ethics and methodologies (Australia and overseas). Karen also applies this knowledge in key roles such as: Academic Advisor: (former Indigenous Clearinghouse Board: AIHW); former Deputy Chair: Griffith University HREC (2013-2017) and as Deputy Chair of the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (AG: DSS 2010 – current).

EXPERTISE

  • The ethical design and conduct of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research
  • Experienced (former) member and chairperson of a HREC
  • The ethical design and conduct of early childhood research
  • Researcher professional development
  • Research ethics reviewer professional development

CONSULTANCY EXPERIENCE

  • University of Tasmania;
  • University of South Australia;
  • James Cook University;
  • Cape York Land Council;
  • ARACY; C&K;
  • World Vision Australia;
  • First Peoples Health Unit: Griffith University.

KEY PUBLICATIONS

  • Walter, M. Martin, K.L. & Bodkin-Andrews, G. (2017). Indigenous children growing up strong: a longitudinal study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. Palgrave Macmillan: UK.
  • Martin, K.L. & Walter, M. (2017). The Story of LSIC: It’s all about trust and vision. In M. Walter, K.L. Martin & G. Bodkin-Andrews. (eds). Indigenous children growing up strong: a longitudinal study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. (pp. 41-60). Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Martin, K.L. (2017). Culture and Identity: LSIC parents beliefs and values and raising young Indigenous children in the 21st Century. In M. Walter, K.L. Martin & G. Bodkin-Andrews. (eds). Indigenous children growing up strong: a longitudinal study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. (pp.79-99). Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Martin, K.L. (2017). Its special and its specific: Understanding the early childhood education experiences and expectations of young Indigenous Australian children and their parents. Australian Educational Researcher – Indigenous Education Special Edition. DOI 10.1007_s13384-017-0231
  • Martin, K.L. (2017). Humpty Dumpty – teaching method or postcolonial method: what do we know about power, voice and identity within early childhood education in the 21st Century? Fleer, M. & van Oers, B. (eds). International handbook on early childhood education. Springer: The Netherlands.
  • Martin, K.L. (2016). Voices and visions: Aboriginal early childhood education in Australia. Mt Victoria: Pademelon Press.
  • Martin, K.L. (2016). Part One: Aboriginal peoples and early childhood education in Australia. In K.L Martin. (ed). Voices and visions: Aboriginal early childhood education in Australia. (pp.1-23). Mt Victoria, NSW: Pademelon Press
  • Martin, K.L. (2016). Part Two: Aboriginal worldviews and knowledges: coming alongside the people and the stories. In K.L Martin. (ed). Voices and visions: Aboriginal early childhood education in Australia. (pp.27-54). Mt Victoria, NSW: Pademelon Press
  • Martin, K.L. (2016). Play, playing along and playing it up: understanding the play of Aboriginal children. In M. Ebbeck, & M. Waniganayake (eds). Children’s play in early childhood education: facilitating learning in diverse contexts (2nd ed). (pp.201-214 ). OUP: Sydney.
  • Martin, K.L. (2013). The more things change, the more they stay the same: creativity as the next colonial turn. In A. Reid; E.P. Hart & M. Peters. (eds). A companion to research in education, DOI10.1007/978094-007-6809-3_39, © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014.
  • Martin, K. (2013). At a loss: scared and excited: a response to Jonathon Silin. In Contemporary Issues in early childhood. Vol: 14: 1 (pp. 29-31).
  • Semann, A., Proud, D. & Martin, K. (2012). Only seeing colour? Identity, pedagogy and ways of knowing. In Fleet, A. Patterson, C. & Robertson, J. (eds). Conversations: behind early childhood pedagogical documentation. (pp. 245-257) Mt Victoria, NSW: Pademelon.
  • Martin, K. (2012). Aboriginal early childhood: past, present, and future. In J Phillips & J Lampert (Eds) Introductory Indigenous Studies in Education: the Importance of Knowing. (pp.27-40) Sydney, NSW: Pearson Education
  • Martin, K. L. (2011). Indigenous research. In MacNaughton, G., Rolfe, S.A. & Siraj-Blatchford, I. (Eds.), Doing early childhood research: International perspectives on theory and practice. (pp85-100) Allen & Unwin: Crows Nest, NSW.
  • Martin, K.L. (2008). Please knock before you enter: Aboriginal regulation of Outsiders and the implications for research and researchers. Teneriffe, Brisbane; PostPressed.
  • Martin, K. (2008). Aboriginal worldview, knowledge and relatedness: re-conceptualising Aboriginal schooling as a teaching-learning and research interface. Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues. Vol 12 pp66-78.
  • Martin, K. (2007). Ma(r)king tracks and reconceptualising Aboriginal early childhood education: an Aboriginal Australian perspective. In Childrenz Issues. Vol 11: 1 (pp21-25).
  • Martin, K (2007). The intersection of Aboriginal knowledges, Aboriginal literacies and New Learning Pedagogies for Aboriginal students. In Healy, A. (ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education. (pp. 58-61). Oxford University Press.
  • Martin, K. (2007). ‘Here we go ‘round the broombie tree’: Aboriginal early childhood realities and experiences in early childhood services. In Ailwood, J. (Ed.), Early childhood in Australia. (pp.18-34). Pearson: Frenchs Forest, NSW.
  • Martin, K. (2005). Childhood, Relatedness and Lifehood: Aboriginal Ways of Being, Knowing and Doing. in J Phillips & J Lampert (Eds) Introductory Indigenous Studies in Education: the Importance of Knowing. (pp.27-40) Sydney, NSW: Pearson Education.
  • Martin, K. (2003). Ways of Knowing, Being and Doing: A theoretical framework and methods for Indigenous and Indigenist research. In K. McWilliam, P. Stephenson & G. Thompson (Eds), Voicing Dissent, New Talents 21C: Next Generation Australian Studies. (pp.203-214). St Lucia, Qld: University of Queensland Press.