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ResourcesResearch IntegrityWhat does it mean to “take responsibility for” a paper? – Scientist Sees Squirrel (Stephen Heard | July 2018)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

What does it mean to “take responsibility for” a paper? – Scientist Sees Squirrel (Stephen Heard | July 2018)

Published/Released on July 17, 2018 | Posted by Admin on October 8, 2018 / , , , , ,
 


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 I spend a lot of time talking with students and colleagues about what authorship means, and about what criteria one might use for assigning it.  That’s partly because the nature of authorship is both complex and (especially for early-career scientists) critically important.  It’s also because my research has evolved in ways that mean I rarely write a single-authored paper any more.  In fact, I rarely write a 2- or 3-authored paper any more.

A useful discussion about an expression (Agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work) that is oft used, but is it understood? A useful read for HDR candidates and early career researchers. We have included links to a swag of articles reflecting on authorship.

There’s nothing unusual about me (in this respect); the lengths of author lists have been increasing in almost every field.  In some fields, they’ve reached startling proportions, with author lists surpassing 5,000.  It’s not universally agreed exactly what contributions merit authorship, or what responsibilities coauthors bear.  However, one thing we often hear – and I’m pretty sure, one thing I’ve said – is that each coauthor should be willing to take responsibility for the entire paper.  Take, for example, the recommendations on coauthorship from the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors:
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The ICMJE recommends that authorship be based on the following 4 criteria:
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  • Substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work; AND
  • Drafting the work or revising it critically for important intellectual content; AND
  • Final approval of the version to be published; AND
  • Agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.
    ,

Read the rest of this discussion piece



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