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ResourcesHuman Research EthicsU.S. Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee (CDC | December 2015)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

U.S. Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee (CDC | December 2015)

 


View full details | Go to resource #1, resource #2, resource #3


The Study Begins

In 1932, the Public Health Service, working with the Tuskegee Institute, began a study to record the natural history of syphilis in hopes of justifying treatment programs for blacks. It was called the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.”

The study initially involved 600 black men – 399 with syphilis, 201 who did not have the disease. The study was conducted without the benefit of patients’ informed consent. Researchers told the men they were being treated for “bad blood,” a local term used to describe several ailments, including syphilis, anemia, and fatigue. In truth, they did not receive the proper treatment needed to cure their illness. In exchange for taking part in the study, the men received free medical exams, free meals, and burial insurance. Although originally projected to last 6 months, the study actually went on for 40 years.

Read the rest of background of this case and timeline
Presidential apology
Research implications

 



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