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ResourcesResearch IntegrityScientific Misbehavior in Economics: Unacceptable research practice linked to perceived pressure to publish (Papers: Sarah Necker 2014)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Scientific Misbehavior in Economics: Unacceptable research practice linked to perceived pressure to publish (Papers: Sarah Necker 2014)

Published/Released on July 23, 2014 | Posted by Admin on January 7, 2016 / , , , , , , , ,
 


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Upholding research integrity depends on our ability to understand the extent of misconduct. Sarah Necker describes her landmark study on economists’ research norms and practices. Fabrication, falsification and plagiarism are widely considered to be unjustifiable, but misbehaviour is still prevalent. For example, 1-3% of economists surveyed admit that they have accepted or offered gifts, money, or sex in exchange for co-authorship, data, or promotion. Economists’ perceived pressure to publish is found to be positively related to their admission of being involved in several rejected research practices.

Science is the endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of how the world works. Trust in scientific research is grounded on the assumption that the researchers report their work honestly and accurately. The results are expected to be unbiased by the researchers’ presumptions or strategic behavior. Experiments in the social sciences in which the researcher acted on behalf of each participant strongly mislead scientific progress. Cherry-picking of findings that conform to a desired hypothesis may be interpreted as the “quest for positive results” but not exactly as the “quest for truth.”

While certain practices clearly represent scientific misbehavior, the justifiability of others is less obvious. What is the bottom line of acceptable behavior? How prevalent are rejected practices? An anonymous online survey among the members of the European Economic Association yields evidence for economics. It is the first study of economists’ research norms and their engagement in a variety of research practices.”

Necker, S (2014) Scientific Misbehavior in Economics: Unacceptable research practice linked to perceived pressure to publish. LSE Impact Bloghttp://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2014/07/23/scientific-misbehavior-in-economics/



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