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ResourcesHuman Research EthicsRethinking Informed Consent in Biobanking and Biomedical Research: a Taiwanese Aboriginal Perspective and the Implementation of Group Consultation (Papers: Chih-hsing Ho | 2017)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Rethinking Informed Consent in Biobanking and Biomedical Research: a Taiwanese Aboriginal Perspective and the Implementation of Group Consultation (Papers: Chih-hsing Ho | 2017)

 


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Abstract
The current informed consent mechanism is based mainly on the rationale of individualism, particularly for its emphasis on autonomy and self-determination. However, in biobanking and genetic research, research findings may pose a risk of harm to the collective, quite aside from a particular individual. Under this circumstance, individual consent needs to be supplemented by other mechanisms, such as group consent obtained from the relevant group or community. In Taiwan, the inclusion of Taiwanese aborigines in biobanking and genetic research challenges the conventional wisdom of individual consent-taking, which overlooks the significance of collective involvement in decision-making. This paper discusses the rationale of the group consent requirement in Taiwan, which seeks to include Taiwanese aborigines’ perspectives, and the related measures that have been pronounced to implement group consultation. It is further argued that consent procedures should not be transactional in being primarily focused on types of information that is to be communicated. Rather, it should be a process that ensures comprehension, empowerment and trust.

Keywords
Informed consent, Biobanking, Biomedical research. Group consultation, Taiwanese aborigines, Human Subjects Research Act

Ho, C.-h. (2017). “Rethinking Informed Consent in Biobanking and Biomedical Research: a Taiwanese Aboriginal Perspective and the Implementation of Group Consultation.” Asian Bioethics Review 9(4): 353-365.
Publisher (Open Access):  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s41649-017-0037-5



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