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ResourcesHuman Research EthicsResearch ethics: How to Treat People who Participate in Research – NIH (Ezekiel Emanuel, et al | nd)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Research ethics: How to Treat People who Participate in Research – NIH (Ezekiel Emanuel, et al | nd)

 


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Excerpt from a commentary written by Gary Allen and Mark Israel.

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Finding a free and polished human research ethics resource from a highly reputable source should be cause for celebration and so its inclusion in an institutional resource library might seem to be a foregone conclusion.
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But…
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In this case, AHRECS also suggests caution. We think that, like many international sources of advice, it calls for some local commentary, so the brochure does not have an unexpected negative impact. There is nothing egregious about this document; it may be a really good source of advice for medical research in the United States. Our concern is about the uncritical adoption of such work across disciplines, methodologies and countries.
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The full commentary is available to USD1/month AHRECS patrons.

Introduction
In Alabama from the 1930s to 1970s, researchers recruited black men to participate in a study of syphilis – a terrible disease that can cause disability and death. The researchers told the men participating that they were getting medical treatment, even though they were not. in fact, when the study began syphilis was untreatable. the researchers instead wanted to study what syphilis does to the body over time. after World War ii, when a treatment – penicillin – was available for syphilis, the researchers kept the men from receiving it because they wanted to study what happened as the disease got worse. What makes this study – the Tuskegee Syphilis Study – unethical? What is wrong with the way the researchers acted?
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A human exercise experiment or class survey designed by a student for a science fair seems very different from the tuskegee syphilis study. however, is there anything about student studies that might raise ethical concerns?
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Human subjects research is exactly what it sounds like. it is research that uses people as the subjects of experiments or studies. it can include giving people new drugs, doing tests on their blood, even having them take surveys. Researchers have a duty to treat the people they study ethically and respectfully. in particular, it is important to make sure that researchers do not exploit their subjects. Exploitation is addressed further on page 9. unfortunately, as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study shows, some people were treated.
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Unfortunately, as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study shows, some people were treated horribly during research studies in the past. German and Japanese researchers, for instance, conducted terrible experiments on prisoners during World War ii. Many other incidents took place before the 1970s, when some u.s. doctors experimented on hospital patients without telling them or failed to provide medicines that would have treated potentially deadly diseases. Today, there are ethical principles for research to help ensure that people who participate are not harmed and that the scandals of the past do not occur again.these principles even apply to student research projects with humans, and they are important for you to think about as you design experiments.

Access  the brochure

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction 3
Introduction to the 7 Principles 4
Other Important Concepts and Issues 8
Applying the Principles 10
Further Reading

Emanuel, E, Abodler, E. and Stunkel, L. (nd) Research ethics: How to Treat People who Participate in Research. US National Institutes of Health.
https://bioethics.nih.gov/education/FNIH_BioethicsBrochure_WEB.PDF



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