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ResourcesHuman Research EthicsReasoning “Uncharted Territory”: Notions of Expertise Within Ethics Review Panels Assessing Research Use of Social Media (Papers: Chelsea Sellers, et al | February 2019 )

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Reasoning “Uncharted Territory”: Notions of Expertise Within Ethics Review Panels Assessing Research Use of Social Media (Papers: Chelsea Sellers, et al | February 2019 )

Published/Released on February 14, 2019 | Posted by Admin on January 5, 2020 / , , ,
 


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Abstract

Of late, AHRECS has been asked numerous times to conduct professional development for HREC members, and in-meeting briefings on online research.  But committee expertise on project designs is an important general point to make.  For example: If an HREC doesn’t have access to someone (or more than one) who has run a clinical trial or been involved in trials groups and trial management then they have insufficient expertise to review trials.  During the preparation of a meeting agenda, the Chair and Secretary should discuss the committee’s relevant expertise and needs.

The fast changing field of social media (SM) research presents unique challenges for research ethics committees (RECs). This article examines notions of experience and expertise in the context of REC members reviewing proposals for SM research and considers the role of the RECs in this area of review. We analyze 19 interviews with REC members to highlight that a lack of personal and professional experience of SM, compounded by a lack of institutional and professional guidelines, mean many REC members feel they do not possess sufficient expertise to review SM research. This view was supported by 14 interviews with SM researchers. REC members drew on strategies to overcome their lack of experience, although most SM researchers still found this problematic, to varying degrees. We recommend several steps to ensure REC expertise in SM research keeps pace of this fast-developing field, taking a pro-active, dialogic approach.

Keywords
social media, research ethics committee, ethics, experience, expertise

Samuel, G. N., Samuel, G. and Derrick, G. (2019). Civil society stakeholder views on forensic DNA phenotyping: balancing risks and benefits. Special Issue: Ethical Issues in Social Media Research
Publisher (Open Access): https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1556264619837088



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