ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Resource Library

Research Ethics MonthlyAbout Us

ResourcesResearch IntegrityOld Media, New Media, Data Media: Evolving Publishing Paradigms – The Scholarly Kitchen (Joseph Esposito September 2016)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Old Media, New Media, Data Media: Evolving Publishing Paradigms – The Scholarly Kitchen (Joseph Esposito September 2016)

Published/Released on October 27, 2016 | Posted by Admin on October 29, 2016 / , , , ,
 


View full details | Go to resource


It is not so long ago that we routinely talked of Old vs. New Media. The “Old” was characterized by the investment in and creation of content, which in turn gave rise to a common set of properties — definitive and authoritative journalism and scientific reports, the fixed text, the pursuit of the finest authors and (in media beyond scholarly communications) the top creative talent. Old Media was analogue. New Media, on the other hand, was digital and had its own set of properties — the dynamic text, interactivity, user-generated content, and the emergence of the platform metaphor, upon which content created by others would reside. (There is an overlap in this summary and the thesis of Tim O’Reilly’s classic essay “What is Web 2.0?”)

If the iconic brands associated with Old Media were Encyclopaedia Britannica (where I once worked) and the Oxford English Dictionary, New Media had its own heroes, Facebook chief among them. Debates about Old and New often rose, or descended, to arguments about maintaining standards on one hand and the democratization of culture on the other. Even though I have strong sympathies for traditional media forms (is there anything anywhere finer than the 19th-century British novel or the films of Stanley Kubrick?), I always feel a bit puckish when I hear an executive of an established Old Media company, extracting profits like a shower of gold, talk about how the world will inevitably fall into the abyss if they are in any way inhibited from doing what they do, as though the health of the culture were in direct proportion to the profits at Elsevier, John Wiley, The New York Times, and The Disney Corporation. To be a Keeper of Civilization is a stout and necessary responsibility, and all these reckless activities at Mendeley, Sci-Hub, and ResearchGate must be brought to an end.

Read the rest of this opinion piece



Resources Menu

Research Integrity


Human Research Ethics

0