ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Resource Library

Research Ethics MonthlyAbout Us

ResourcesResearch IntegrityNew web services are helping authors make data-driven decisions when choosing which journal to submit to – LSE Impact Blog

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

New web services are helping authors make data-driven decisions when choosing which journal to submit to – LSE Impact Blog

Published/Released on October 09, 2017 | Posted by Admin on January 10, 2018 / , , , , ,
 


View full details | Go to resource


With more than 34,000 active scholarly peer-reviewed journals, how do authors choose which one to submit to? Amy ForresterBo-Christer Björk and Carol Tenopir liken this process to a long-term investment decision, with access to critical information on a variety of factors being imperative. A new generation of web tools and services can help authors to find data on journals and publishers and so make informed selection decisions; assessing information on impact and prestige, service quality, and publication cost and policy. Ultimately, of course, the onus remains on the authors to weigh these multiple factors against their own unique publication and career needs.

Authors seek to publish the results of their research in the best journal possible, one that most closely fits their topic and is likely to have the biggest impact. But of the 34,000+ active scholarly peer-reviewed journals, how do authors go about choosing a specific one to submit to? Many studies have examined this submission decision process and the complex collection of competing criteria (see, for example, Tenopir et al. (2011) or Mabe and Mulligan (2011)). Decisions depend on factors that can be summarised as relating to the impact and prestige of the journal and/or publisher; service quality of the peer review and/or publishing process; and publication costs and policies, including open access and article processing fees. These are the parameters authors must weigh against their personal publication and career needs and that, together with the perceived likelihood of acceptance, drive the choice of journal for submission.

We liken this process to a long-term investment decision. As such, authors need critical information about multiple characteristics of journals and publishers. Most commonly, authors gather information by exploring a journal’s website or by word of mouth from colleagues. There are several mainstream services that aggregate data on journals and publishers (e.g. Ulrichsweb, DOAJ) that authors might use to guide their decision in choosing a journal for submission. However, while some information is readily available, such as journal impact factor or open access policies and fees, other data is more elusive and can be tricky to obtain, like the acceptance rate or quality of the peer-review process. But there are tools and services being developed to help capture this hard-to-find information.

Read the rest of this discussion piece



Resources Menu

Research Integrity


Human Research Ethics