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ResourcesResearch IntegrityMetrics, recognition, and rewards: it’s time to incentivise the behaviours that are good for research and researchers – LSE Impact Blog (Rebecca Lawrence | November 2017)

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Metrics, recognition, and rewards: it’s time to incentivise the behaviours that are good for research and researchers – LSE Impact Blog (Rebecca Lawrence | November 2017)

Published/Released on November 16, 2017 | Posted by Admin on December 30, 2017 / , , , , , , ,
 


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Researchers have repeatedly voiced their dissatisfaction with how the journals they publish in are used as a proxy for the evaluation of their work. However, those who wish to break free of this model fear negative consequences for their future funding and careers. Rebecca Lawrence emphasises the importance of addressing researchers’ recognition and reward structures, arguing it is time to move to a system that uses metrics and indicators that incentivise the types of behaviours that are good for research and researchers. The European Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform has published a series of recommendations on how this might be done, and encourages their adoption by all stakeholder communities across the research process.

A thoughtful and practical piece about an issue that is often bemoaned (the perverse impact of the pressure to publish) without useful alternatives. Such a change would be in the best interest of us all.

I have written before about the European Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform (OSPP), and our aims and areas of focus. Previously I focused on metrics and evaluation, and the need for incentives and associated recognition and rewards to both enable and encourage researchers to adopt more open practices for the benefit of research and society. This needs the buy-in of stakeholders across the spectrum. As Chair of the Next-Generation Metrics working group (previously named Altmetrics working group), whose recommendations are published today, I’d like to provide my personal view on the role the EC – and other funding agencies and research-performing institutions – could play in driving real action and change.
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At F1000, we hear time and again from researchers keen to break with traditional publishing models, and from the proxies the journals they publish in provide for the evaluation of their work, but who fear negative consequences for their future funding and careers. At a debate on peer review in September, Meghan Larin, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Francis Crick Institute, spoke about the frustrations she and her peers face when trying to publish in the “right” journals to progress their careers. We also frequently hear from researchers across disciplines whose contributions to research include outputs beyond traditional article formats, such as data or software code, but who struggle to receive credit for those contributions.
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