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ResourcesResearch IntegrityMedical ethicist: “I now understand that I should not have been re-using material” – Retraction Watch (Alison McCook | July 2018)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Medical ethicist: “I now understand that I should not have been re-using material” – Retraction Watch (Alison McCook | July 2018)

Published/Released on July 20, 2018 | Posted by Admin on August 20, 2018 / , , , ,
 


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A researcher in medical ethics has retracted two papers within the last two years after admitting to reusing material from previous publications.

This case can serve as a salutary example when talking in professional development activities about recycling text/self-plagiarism. Given the career impacts of even good-faith-errors, researchers cannot afford to risk a forced retraction being how they learn their responsibilities. We have included links to a few related items.

Ezio Di Nucci, based at the University of Copenhagen, claims he “had misunderstood the relevant practices.”
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The first retraction, issued in 2017 by the Journal of Value Inquiry, notes the paper “constituted the third verbatim publication of the same text.” The paper “Strategic Bombing, Causal Beliefs, and Double Effect” has only been cited once since it was published in 2016, according to Clarivate Analytics’ Web of Science.
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After that retraction, Di Nucci told us he requested the retraction of a second 2016 article, published by Minds and Machines. The retraction notice for “Habits, Priming and the Explanation of Mindless Action” — which has not yet been indexed — states that “the author misunderstood the practice of re-using one’s own material and apologizes for any inconvenience caused.”
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