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Research IntegrityIllegitimate Journals and How to Stop Them: An Interview with Kelly Cobey and Larissa Shamseer – Scholarly Kitchen (Alice Meadows | December 2017)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Illegitimate Journals and How to Stop Them: An Interview with Kelly Cobey and Larissa Shamseer – Scholarly Kitchen (Alice Meadows | December 2017)

Published/Released on December 05, 2017 | Posted by Admin on January 5, 2018 / , , , , , ,
 


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Earlier this year, David Moher, Larissa Shamseer, Kelly Cobey, and colleagues caused a bit of a stir when they published an article in Nature showing that, contrary to some (many?) expectations, it’s not just authors from low-income countries who publish in so-called “predatory” journals. In fact, their analysis of nearly 2,000 biomedical articles from more than 200 predatory journals found that “more than half of the corresponding authors hailed from high- and upper-middle-income countries as defined by the World Bank.”

This thought-provoking Scholarly Kitchen piece reflects on ‘predatory publishers’ – the term, who publishes with them, the misclassification of some open access publishers, and what we can do about the scourge of illegitimate publishers.

A just-published follow-up article in Nature Human Behaviour focuses on what constitutes a predatory, or in Moher et al’s words, illegitimate journal, and, critically, on what can be done to help authors avoid publishing in them.

In this interview, Kelly Cobey and Larissa Shamseer (both of the Centre for Journalology, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) share their thoughts on what is meant by the term “illegitimate journal”, why these publications are proving so successful at attracting authors, and the community actions needed to stop their spread.

Read the rest of this discussion piece

Also see:
In a world of hijacked, clone and zombie publishing, where shouldn’t I publish?
Examining publishing practices: moving beyond the idea of predatory open access
Continuing Steps to Ensuring Credibility of NIH Research: Selecting Journals with…
Illegitimate Journals and How to Stop Them: An Interview with Kelly Cobey and…
Open access, power, and privilege



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