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ResourcesResearch IntegrityGuest post by James McCrostie: Don’t fall prey to a predatory conference – Conference Inference (James McCrostie | April 2017)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Guest post by James McCrostie: Don’t fall prey to a predatory conference – Conference Inference (James McCrostie | April 2017)

Published/Released on April 10, 2017 | Posted by Admin on April 21, 2018 / , , , ,
 


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James McCrostie addresses the phenomenon of ‘predatory conferences’ – and how to spot one when it emails us.

An invite to be a keynote speaker, or even just to present a paper, at a conference in a desirable location might seem to combine a career boost and a nice trip, but is it a scam? Illegitimate conferences are real, so early career researchers need to learn the skills to spot them. Especially as it has been suggested they outnumber genuine conferences. This post suggests some fairly straightforward ways to spot them.

All researchers’ spam folders get inundated with invitations to present at conferences of dubious scholarly substance. Most don’t give them much consideration apart from asking themselves who actually goes to these things? Unfortunately, the rise of total number and size of predatory conference organizers hints at their profitability and makes it obvious the problem needs to be taken more seriously.
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Predatory conference organizers are for-profit companies that use some kind of deceit to prey on researchers’ need to present and publish their research by holding academic events designed to maximize profits rather than spread knowledge. For example, most claim to operate a rigorous peer review system but in fact this is absent or insufficient.
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