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ResourcesResearch IntegrityFraud Scandals Sap China’s Dream of Becoming a Science Superpower – The New York Times (Amy Qin | October 2017)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Fraud Scandals Sap China’s Dream of Becoming a Science Superpower – The New York Times (Amy Qin | October 2017)

 


View full details | Go to resource #1, resource #2


BEIJING — Having conquered world markets and challenged American political and military leadership, China has set its sights on becoming a global powerhouse in a different field: scientific research. It now has more laboratory scientists than any other country, outspends the entire European Union on research and development, and produces more scientific articles than any other nation except the United States.

When thinking about research misconduct in China it’s important to remember the immense size of their research base and how quickly it has grown. Significant sanction and penalty efforts are underway (see the second linked story) but focusing on the culture of research practice would be better.

But in its rush to dominance, China has stood out in another, less boastful way. Since 2012, the country has retracted more scientific papers because of faked peer reviews than all other countries and territories put together, according to Retraction Watch, a blog that tracks and seeks to publicize retractions of research papers.
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Now, a recent string of high-profile scandals over questionable or discredited research has driven home the point in China that to become a scientific superpower, it must first overcome a festering problem of systemic fraud.
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Read the rest of this discussion piece
Also see China’s High Court issue a warning to Life Science companies



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