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ResourcesResearch IntegrityFederal Trade Commission and National Institutes of Health Take Action Against Predatory Publishing Practices – Scholarly Kitchen (Rick Anderson | December 2017)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Federal Trade Commission and National Institutes of Health Take Action Against Predatory Publishing Practices – Scholarly Kitchen (Rick Anderson | December 2017)

Published/Released on December 04, 2017 | Posted by Admin on December 25, 2017 / , , , , , ,
 


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In an interesting and potentially significant move for the scholarly publishing world, the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada has granted a preliminary injunction against a major journal publisher and conference organizer in response to a complaint by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The injunction was granted on the basis of the Court’s analysis of evidence provided by the FTC and its finding that the FTC’s complaint, if allowed to proceed, “is likely to succeed on the merits” and that the public interest would be served by granting it.

The action by the FTC is significant because it’s a formal legal action that not only helps to shed much-needed light on a serious and growing problem in the scholarly communication ecosystem

The FTC alleges that OMICS Group and its affiliates iMedPub LLC and Conference Series Ltd have engaged in a variety of “unfair and deceptive practices with respect to the publication of online academic journals and organization of scientific conferences,” including:
.

  • Falsely claiming to provide rigorous peer review of articles submitted for publication in their journals;
  • Claiming as “editors” individuals who never received manuscripts to review or edit, or who never even agreed to be appointed as editors — some of whom say that OMICS ignored or refused their demands that they be removed from journal mastheads;
  • Sending solicitations to potential authors on behalf of other academics, without the latter’s permission or knowledge;
  • Giving their journals names “nearly identical to other respected journals, which has led to consumers mistakenly submitting articles to Defendants’ journal”;
    .

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