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ResourcesHuman Research EthicsEverything You Need to Know About Conflicts of Interest (Part II) – Psychology Today (Sara Gorman and Jack M. Gorman | February 2017)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Everything You Need to Know About Conflicts of Interest (Part II) – Psychology Today (Sara Gorman and Jack M. Gorman | February 2017)

 


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It’s not just about the money.

As we discussed in Part I of this three-part series on conflicts of interest, it’s not exactly a surprise that money can be a powerful influence on scientists’ and physicians’ behavior. Scientists and physicians who take money from drug companies are prone to design studies in ways that favor the company’s products[1], to minimize adverse side effects the company’s medications cause, and to prescribe the company’s medications to their patients.[2] Organizations that formulate guidelines for the treatment of various illnesses often have financial relationships with companies that make products recommended in the guidelines.[3]

These facts have led to many policies that attempt to make financial relationships between the pharmaceutical industry and the biomedical world more transparent. Journals require disclosure statements by authors of potential conflicts of interest and laws like the federal Physicians Payment Sunshine Act of 2010 mandate that payments by medical product manufacturers to physicians and teaching hospitals be reported to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) and made public on a website.

Other forms of financial incentives to scientists also frequently make the news. Recently, for example, the media revealed that scientists who concluded that fat rather than sugar is the most harmful part of our diet received money to support their research from the sugar industry. Similar alarms have been raised about the relationships between agricultural scientists who study the effects of pesticides and the safety of GMOs and the companies that make those products.

Read the rest of this discussion piece
Go to Part I of this series
This is Part II of this series
Go to Part III of this series*

* Part III doesn’t really discuss Conflicts of interest in research of any CoI so though we link to it here we’ve not included Part III in the Resource Library



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