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ResourcesResearch IntegrityContinuing allegations of research misconduct require system reform – china.org.cn (Richard de Grijs | June 2017)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Continuing allegations of research misconduct require system reform – china.org.cn (Richard de Grijs | June 2017)

 


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It is generally understood that the reputation of an individual is hurt by a forced retraction, and that impact can last decades. Similarly there’s data that points to the impact affecting all the named coauthors of a retracted paper, not just the guilty parties or first author. The potential for impacts on an entire institution are less clear but are definitely reason for executive-level concern, but the possibility of impacts upon an entire country is apparently worrying enough to prompt a firm response. But is a one-size-fits-all response the answer?

Research practices in China recently hit the international headlines again. Springer, the publishing behemoth jointly based in Germany and the U.S., retracted more than a hundred scientific articles authored by Chinese scientists from its journals.
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Apparently, “fake” peer reviews were behind the latest retractions: Scrutiny of research articles undertaken by third parties were not conducted as independently or impartially as appearances may have suggested.
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This kind of news, yet again, is really disheartening to the majority of Chinese scientists who rigorously comply with the requirement for ethical research, and it exasperates me. Admittedly, Springer pointed out that research fraud is a global problem; however, China is often singled out.
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