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ResourcesResearch Integrity“A concerning – largely unrecognised – threat to patient safety:” Nursing reviews cite retracted trials – Retraction Watch (Alison McCook | January 2018)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

“A concerning – largely unrecognised – threat to patient safety:” Nursing reviews cite retracted trials – Retraction Watch (Alison McCook | January 2018)

Published/Released on January 08, 2018 | Posted by Admin on January 16, 2018 / , , , ,
 


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Too many papers cite retracted research — even after it’s been retracted. It’s a problem. It can be especially a problem in clinical fields, where patient care is at stake. Recently, Richard Gray at La Trobe University in Australia and his colleagues examined the scope of the problem in the nursing field, noting how many systematic reviews included findings from retracted clinical trials. We spoke with Gray about their findings, published in the International Journal of Nursing Studies — and what they might mean for the safety of patients.

We were so impressed by this discussion and the importance of the central point that we have invited Richard to write a guest post for a future edition of the Research Ethics Monthly (we hope to be able to include it in the May 2018 edition).

Retraction Watch: Retractions are a concern in any field, but as you note, when clinical practice is at stake, it can be particularly worrisome. Do you think your findings raise any potential concerns about patient safety?
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Richard Gray:  We identified 23 reviews that included a retracted trial. In a clinical discipline such as nursing, practitioners rely heavily on systematic reviews to inform their care and treatment decisions. If a review includes a study that is retracted, the integrity of the review must be challenged. There is no established mechanism to do this. As a consequence, clinicians may continue to base decisions on evidence from systematic reviews that is unsound. This is a concerning – largely unrecognised – threat to patient safety.
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Read the rest of this interview



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