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ResourcesResearch IntegrityChina introduces ‘social’ punishments for scientific misconduct – Nature (David Cyranoski | December 2018)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

China introduces ‘social’ punishments for scientific misconduct – Nature (David Cyranoski | December 2018)

Published/Released on December 14, 2018 | Posted by Admin on December 16, 2018 / , , , ,
 


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Offending researchers could face restrictions on jobs, loans and business opportunities under a system tied to the controversial social credit policy.

Researchers in China who commit scientific misconduct could soon be prevented from getting a bank loan, running a company or applying for a public-service job. The government has announced an extensive punishment system that could have significant consequences for offenders — far beyond their academic careers.

Irrespective of how you feel about China’s Social Credit Policy, it will be fascinating to see if this bold plan will alter the perceived risks/rewards for researchers who contemplate cheating.

Under the new policy, dozens of government agencies will have the power to hand out penalties to those caught committing major scientific misconduct, a role previously performed by the science ministry or universities. Errant researchers could also face punishments that have nothing to do with research, such as restrictions on jobs outside academia, as well as existing misconduct penalties, such as losing grants and awards.
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“Almost all aspects of daily life for the guilty scientists could be affected,” says Chen Bikun, who studies scientific evaluation systems at Nanjing University of Science and Technology.
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