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ResourcesResearch IntegrityBeyond Beall’s List: Better understanding predatory publishers – Association of College & Research Libraries (Monica Berger and Jill Cirasella | March 2015)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Beyond Beall’s List: Better understanding predatory publishers – Association of College & Research Libraries (Monica Berger and Jill Cirasella | March 2015)

 


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If you have even a fleeting interest in the evolving landscape of scholarly communication, you’ve probably heard of predatory open access (OA) journals. These are OA journals that exist for the sole purpose of profit, not the dissemination of high-quality research findings and furtherance of knowledge. These predators generate profits by charging author fees, also known as article processing charges (APCs), that far exceed the cost of running their low-quality, fly-by-night operations.

Charging a fee is not itself a marker of a predatory publisher: many reputable OA journals use APCs to cover costs, especially in fields where research is often funded by grants. (Many subscription-based journals also charge authors fees, sometimes per page or illustration.) However, predatory journals are primarily fee-collecting operations—they exist for that purpose and only incidentally publish articles, generally without rigorous peer review, despite claims to the contrary.

Of course, low-quality publishing is not new. There have long been opportunistic publishers (e.g., vanity presses and sellers of public domain content) and deceptive publishing practices (e.g., yellow journalism and advertisements formatted to look like articles).

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