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ResourcesHuman Research EthicsWhen the Anths Come Marching In (Papers: Michelle Trudgett and Susan Page 2014)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

When the Anths Come Marching In (Papers: Michelle Trudgett and Susan Page 2014)

 


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Excerpt: This essay provides a first-hand account of why it is important to have Indigenous representation on Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs), and more importantly why some research simply should not go ahead. Collectively we have 10 years experience serving on HRECs, extensive Indigenous Higher Education research, as well as our lived experience as Indigenous Australians. Despite such experience and expertise, we find ourselves too often in the firing lines of unhappy researchers whose breathtaking sense of entitlement underlines their claims to ‘know’ a particular community. As a noted Native American scholar notes in relation research on Indigenous peoples:
We have been observed, noted, taped, and videoed. Our behaviors have been recorded in every possible way known to Western Science, and I suppose we could learn to live with this if we had not become imprisoned in the anthropologist’s words. The language that anthropologists use to explain us traps us in linguistic cages because we must explain our ways through alien hypothetical constructs and theoretical frameworks (King 2012: 207).

Trudgett M and Page S (2014) When the Anths Come Marching In. The Australian Journal of Anthropology 25 (3): 388-390
Publisher: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/taja.12109_8/abstract



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