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ResourcesHuman Research EthicsTraditional and Electronic Informed Consent for Biobanking: A Survey of U.S. Biobanks (Papers: Simon Christian, et al 2014)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Traditional and Electronic Informed Consent for Biobanking: A Survey of U.S. Biobanks (Papers: Simon Christian, et al 2014)

Published/Released on December 15, 2014 | Posted by Admin on March 5, 2017 / , , , , , , , , ,
 


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Abstract:
Biobanks face unique challenges obtaining consent from biospecimen contributors. Electronic consent (e-consent) presents one option for streamlining the biobank consent process, and improving contributor understanding of consent information. An e-mail survey was conducted to establish the extent of current biobank e-consent and interest in future use of e-consent. A total of 235 biobanks were surveyed and 65 (28%) responded with a fully completed survey. Few of these 65 biobanks (8%) reported using e-consent; however, the majority (75%) were interested in e-consent. Many (48%) biobanks were in discussions with institutional stakeholders about using e-consent in the future. Anticipated benefits of e-consent included improved efficiency and increased enrollment. Perceived barriers to e-consent adoption included lack of funding, issues with human subjects approval, and factors affecting user uptake (e.g., computer literacy). Biobanks using e-consent reported cost, technology issues, and difficulty training staff as barriers to e-consent adoption. Traditional consenting methods (e.g., face-to-face, phone, and mail) continued to be used at biobanks reporting use of e-consent. The survey results suggest strong interest in e-consent among U.S. biobanks, and a need to consider a range of implementation issues, including user preferences and receptivity; institutional and technical support; integration with clinical data networks; electronic signature capture; and what type of e-consent to implement. Biobanks will need evidence-based guidance for purposes of addressing these issues, so that e-consent processes enhance efficiency, as well as contributor receptivity, understanding, and trust.

Simon Christian M, Klein David W, and Schartz Helen A (2014) Biopreservation and Biobanking. December 2014, 12(6): 423-429. doi:10.1089/bio.2014.0045
Publisher: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/bio.2014.0045



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