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ResourcesResearch IntegrityControversial Australian science journalist admits to duplication in her PhD thesis – Retraction Watch (Alison McCook | May 2018)

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Controversial Australian science journalist admits to duplication in her PhD thesis – Retraction Watch (Alison McCook | May 2018)

 


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A prominent (yet controversial) journalist in Australia has admitted to duplicating three images that were part of her PhD thesis — a practice outside experts agreed was acceptable, if not ideal, at the time, according to a report released today.

Stories like this raise the question: Should data/research materials retention requirements be extended?

As part of an inquiry, the University of Adelaide convened an expert panel to investigate 17 allegations of duplication and/or manipulation in Maryanne Demasi’s 2004 thesis. Duplication is a common reason for retractions, such as when researchers use the same image to depict the results of different experiments.
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After earning her PhD in rheumatology, Demasi became a journalist who got headlines for more than just her reporting. In 2013, she produced a controversial series about cholesterol and fat (which suggested they have been unfairly villainized, and which cast doubt on cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins). A few years later, Demasi was fired from the science program Catalyst, after it aired an episode alleging wi-fi could cause brain tumors.
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