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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

‘It’s never okay to say no to teachers’: Children’s research consent and dissent in conforming schools contexts (Papers: Perpetua Kirby | May 2020)0

Posted by Admin in on June 11, 2020
 

Abstract

With thanks to Dr Jo-Anne Kelder, University of Tasmania for suggesting this great paper.  This is a recommended read for researchers and research ethics reviewers.

This article examines the limits to children giving research consent in everyday school contexts that emphasises their conformity to comply with adult expectations, and highlights children’s competence and agency in navigating this conformity through different practices of dissent. It draws on research into children’s agency, using a multimodal ethnography of Year 1 classrooms in two English primary schools. The article includes a reflexive methodological focus, exploring the extent to which I counter the schools’ emphasis on conformity. This includes creating visuals for children to practice consent; positioning myself as the researcher in a non‐teacher role, as ‘least adult’ and the one who ‘least knows’; and designing interview spaces markedly different from classrooms. The article examines how children navigate conforming discourses by finding different ways to dissent in the research. Firstly, children demonstrate a sophisticated awareness of the cultural norms of indicating refusals beyond saying the word ‘No’. Secondly, children achieve unnoticeablity, by which they absent themselves from the ‘on‐task’ classroom culture, and by extension the research process. Thirdly, they engage in playful dissent, demonstrating their political knowingness of the classroom social order. The article discusses the implications for educational research when the values of consent are in conflict with a schooling focused on conformity. This includes emphasising the limits of consent procedures, paying closer attention to how researchers recognise and respond ethically to children’s multiple practices of dissent, and using research to disrupt problematic power structures in education settings that limit possibilities for children’s consent.

Kirby, P. (2020), ‘It’s never okay to say no to teachers’: Children’s research consent and dissent in conforming schools contexts. British Educational Research Journal. doi:10.1002/berj.3638
Publisher (Open Access): https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/berj.3638

Long-Term Agreement for Services (LTAS) for the Provision of Global Research Quality Assurance Services and an Ethical Review Facility for Evidence Generation (Request for proposal | August 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on August 13, 2019
 

UNICEF is putting out a call for tenders for a Global Ethical Review Facility for the organisation. This would entail undertaking ethical reviews of evidence generation projects across the organization and providing advice on possible mitigation strategies.

Information can be found here: https://www.ungm.org/public/Notice/95212

Gabrielle Berman, PhD
Senior Advisor – Ethics in Evidence Generation
UNICEF Innocenti
Via degli Alfani, 58
Firenze, Italia
50122
Skype: gabrielle.berman

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies – NPR (Rob Stein | June 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on July 20, 2019
 

A Russian scientist says he wants to create more genetically modified babies, flouting international objections that such a step would be premature, unethical and irresponsible.

Denis Rebrikov, a molecular biologist who heads a gene-editing lab at the Kulakov National Medical Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology in Moscow, claims he has developed a safe — and therefore acceptable — way to create gene-edited babies.

“How it can be unethical if we will make [a] healthy baby instead of diseased?” Rebrikov told NPR during his first broadcast interview. “Why? Why [is it] unethical?”

Read the rest of this discussion piece

Infecting healthy people in vaccine research can be ethical and necessary – The Conversation (Michael Selgelid & Euzebiusz Jamrozik | June 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on July 1, 2019
 

Medical experiments involving intentionally infecting people with bacteria, viruses, and parasites are surprisingly common. And they are becoming more common worldwide, particularly in developing countries.

The ultimate aim of these “human challenge studies” is usually to test potential new vaccines.

However, because of the risks involved, this kind of research raises difficult ethical questions. For example, who should be infected? And which pathogens would be too dangerous to use?

Read the rest of this discussion piece

 

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