ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Resource Library

Research Ethics MonthlyAbout Us

ResourcesSocial Science

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Caring for Data: Law, Professional Codes and the Negotiation of Confidentiality in Australian Criminological Research. Report for the Criminology Research Council (Australia) (Papers: Robert Chalmers and Mark Israel | 20050

Posted by Admin in on December 18, 2016
 

Summary

In this report, we offer guidance to criminologists attempting to navigate, and manage the impact of, laws that relate to the protection and disclosure of confidential and personal information that they gather in the course of their research.

We start by providing examples of the impact of relevant laws on the practice of criminologists to set this work in it proper context, and then provide a general overview of laws relating to issues such as privacy, confidentiality and compelled disclosure. Drawing on this background, Section Three provides brief responses to Frequently Asked Questions covering the ways researchers gather, store, use, disclose and reuse information. We conclude by examining possible future developments.

Throughout the report we attempt to illustrate how the practice of criminological research practically intersects with relevant laws. This intersection can be painful as relevant laws are by no means tailored to suit the environment of such research. However, our aim is to help criminologists and their institutions reach better informed decisions about management of legal risks although, of course, this report is not a substitute for specific advice.

Chalmers, R & Israel, M (2005) Caring for Data: Law, Professional Codes and the Negotiation of Confidentiality in Australian Criminological Research. Report for the Criminology Research Council (Australia). 57 pages. http://crg.aic.gov.au/reports/200304-09.pdf

500+ Resources – Part Three of Nominations of best resources0

Posted by Admin in on December 12, 2016
 

This third nomination of favourite resources is from one of the AHRECS  senior consultants Associate Professor Martin Tolich. This week we’re going to be sharing some more nominations of people’s nomination of favourite resources? Got your own favourite? Drop us a line to gary.allen@ahrecs.com with your suggestion.

Extremism is a research ethics minefield | AHRECS Resource Library entry

Researchers work through sensitive topics when researching children and death thinking they have advanced along the continuum reaching the third untouchable rail. In the United States Social Security is the untouchable third rail that politicians will not touch. In Canada no government dares to touch health care. In research ethic committees their third rail is death. Their resistance to permitting researchers to engage the bereaved in research, working from the self-fulfilling prophecy that any study investigating the vulnerability of the bereaved is undermined by the participants’ acute vulnerability. What the Norwegian article demonstrates is there are other third rails along the continuum. In Extremism is a research ethics minefield” the resource expands what there is to know about research ethics.

Participatory research with children and young people (Books – Chapter: Susan Groundwater-Smith, et al | 2014)0

Posted by Admin in on November 29, 2016
 

This book sets out a clear framework for conducting participatory research with children and young people within a discussion of the rights of the child. Through extensive case studies and a close review of contemporary literature, in relation to early childhood through to late adolescence, the book serves as a critical guide to issues in participative research for students and researchers.

The book includes chapters on:

Designing your research project
Ethical considerations
Innovative methods
Publication and dissemination.

Groundwater-Smith S, Dockett S & Bottrell D. (2015). Ethical questions in relation to participatory research with children and young people. In Participatory research with children and young people (pp. 37-54). London, : SAGE Publications Ltd doi: 10.4135/9781473910751.n3
Publisher: https://au.sagepub.com/en-gb/oce/participatory-research-with-children-and-young-people/book241028

Why is the scientific replication crisis centered on psychology? – Statistical Modelling, Causal Inference, and Social Science (Andrew: September 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on November 25, 2016
 

The replication crisis is a big deal. But it’s a problem in lots of scientific fields. Why is so much of the discussion about psychology research?

Why not economics, which is more controversial and gets more space in the news media? Or medicine, which has higher stakes and a regular flow of well-publicized scandals?

Here are some relevant factors that I see, within the field of psychology:

1. Sophistication: Psychology’s discourse on validity, reliability, and latent constructs is much more sophisticated than the usual treatment of measurement in statistics, economics, biology, etc. So you see Paul Meehl raising serious questions as early as the 1960s, at a time in which min other fields we were just getting naive happy talk about how all problems would be solved with randomized experiments.

Read the rest of this discussion piece

0