ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)
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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Research ethics in the Kalahari: issues, contradictions and concerns (Papers: Keyan Tomaselli | 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on September 6, 2018
 

Abstract
The effects of ethical clearance or institutional review board practices are discussed in relation to the experiences of academic field researchers on the one hand and indigenous research participants and/or co-generators of knowledge on the other. Ethical procedures such as protection (do no harm), control (micromanaging methods) and exploitation (taking ownership) are discussed in relation to researcher experiences in southern Africa. Researcher–researched relations, researcher and subject alienation, ethics creep and the clash of ontologies are examined. Some tentative solutions are proposed.

Keywords: ethics, gatekeepers, indigenous rights, institutional review board, Kalahari, ≠Khomani Bushmen

Tomaselli, K.G. (2017): Ethical Procedures? A Critical Intervention: The sacred, the profane, and the planet. The Ethnographic Edge, [S.l.], v. 1, n. 1, p. 3-16.
Publisher: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02560046.2016.1267253

Too dangerous for fieldwork? The challenge of institutional risk-management in primary research on conflict, violence and ‘Terrorism’ (Papers: Jeffrey Sluka | July 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on September 3, 2018
 

Research on conflict and ‘terrorism’ is confronted by an expanding range of daunting ethical, methodological, and institutional challenges. One of these is the increasing involvement of university ethics and fieldwork safety committees in ‘managing’ researcher safety and security as an issue which requires institutional oversight, control, and approval. This paper contributes to contemporary reflection on and conversations about social sciences fieldwork in what is deemed to be an increasingly dangerous world. It focuses specifically on the increasing application of institutional ethics and safety review processes to ‘dangerous’ fieldwork on socio-political violence. While these new restrictions are clothed in the language or idiom of ethics and worker safety and security, a political analysis suggests that these committees represent powerful institutions of censorship and control, a serious challenge to academic freedom, and even movement towards the recolonisation of social science research. This paper describes and addresses this threat, and offers a constructive proposal for potentially responding by the development of risk assessment and management protocols which may contribute both to researcher survival in perilous field sites and help researchers to negotiate the necessary approval by university ethics and safety committees.

luka, J. A. (2018). Too dangerous for fieldwork? The challenge of institutional risk-management in primary research on conflict, violence and ‘Terrorism’. Contemporary Social Science, 1-17. doi:10.1080/21582041.2018.1498534
Publisher: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/21582041.2018.1498534
ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326437314

National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007) – Updated with new link to July 2018 update0

Posted by Admin in on July 12, 2018
 

National Statement 2018 coverThe National Statement is the Australian national reference for human research. It was issued by the NHMRC and has been endorsed by the ARC and UA. The document articulates the four core principles of merit and integrity, beneficence, justice and respect for persons. Specific advice is provided with regard to benefits and risk, informed consent, privacy, methodologies and potential participant populations. Guidance is also provided with regard to the appointment and operation of human research ethics committees, the conduct of ethical reviews, and the responsibilities of institutions. Even though the document has not been enacted compliance with the National Statement is a strict condition of NHMRC and ARC funding.

Since 2014 a joint working group (including appointees from AHEC, the ARC and UA) have been conducting a rolling review of the National Statement. Dr Allen is involved in this rolling review.

In 2015-17 a joint drafting committee (including appointees from AHEC, the ARC and UA) drafted changes and addition to the chapters in Section 3 of the National Statement, as well as corresponding changes to Section 5 and the glossary Dr Allen, Prof Israel and Prof Thomson, are involved in this rolling review.

Access – the PDF copy | the NS page

National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia (2007, updated 2018) National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. Available at: https://nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/national-statement-ethical-conduct-human-research-2007-updated-2018

The Lifespan of a Lie – Medium (Ben Blum | June 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on July 1, 2018
 

The most famous psychology study of all time was a sham. Why can’t we escape the Stanford Prison Experiment?

It was late in the evening of August 16th, 1971, and twenty-two-year-old Douglas Korpi, a slim, short-statured Berkeley graduate with a mop of pale, shaggy hair, was locked in a dark closet in the basement of the Stanford psychology department, naked beneath a thin white smock bearing the number 8612, screaming his head off.

Blog post and interviews that underpins the recent (June 2018) Inside HigherEd story reflecting on the legacy of the Stamford Prison Experiment.

“I mean, Jesus Christ, I’m burning up inside!” he yelled, kicking furiously at the door. “Don’t you know? I want to get out! This is all fucked up inside! I can’t stand another night! I just can’t take it anymore!”
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It was a defining moment in what has become perhaps the best-known psychology study of all time. Whether you learned about Philip Zimbardo’s famous “Stanford Prison Experiment” in an introductory psych class or just absorbed it from the cultural ether, you’ve probably heard the basic story.
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Read the rest of this discussion piece  

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