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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

How to organize a conference that’s open to everyone – Nature (Nic Fleming | July 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on August 17, 2019
 

Thinking about the needs of all participants is key to a successful event.

Having enjoyed their meal in a neo-Gothic, wood-panelled grand hall, most delegates were on their way to the afternoon sessions. Meanwhile, Caroline Miles had just spent 20 minutes sitting in her wheelchair looking at the back of the delivery van blocking her path to both the talk and the lunch.

The simple strategies described in this piece speak not only to respect and justice in our endeavours, failing to be inclusive can significantly limit the relevance and impact of our work.  Gary has been compiling anecdotes from the field that would make you cry with laughter, or just cry.

Miles, a solicitor turned independent-researcher specializing in legal issues relating to social care, describes her attendance at the Socio-Legal Studies Association (SLSA) annual meeting at the University of Bristol, UK, last March as “demeaning and embarrassing and just horrible”. The talks took place across two buildings, and the lifts were frequently filled with participants who could have used nearby stairs. Her access was blocked by delivery vehicles on two occasions. When this made her late, sessions had to be interrupted as tables and chairs were rearranged to fit her in. Miles was provided with a dedicated support worker by the university, but says that networking took place in standing spaces that had no chairs at her level, and that access to disabled toilets was blocked by participants having refreshments.
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As Miles waited for someone to find the driver of the delivery vehicle blocking her way into the main meeting venue for the second time, she finally gave up. “I burst into tears and said, ‘That’s it, I’m going home’.”
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Using ASCO’s Clinical Database for Commercial Research Raises Questions, Ethicists Say – Medscape (Ellie Kincaid | May 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on August 8, 2019
 

Eleven abstracts of the thousands accepted for publication at this year’s annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), one of the largest cancer research conferences in the world, draw upon data collected through a nonprofit subsidiary of ASCO that in 4 years has brought together the electronic health records (EHRs) of 1.2 million patients.

The ASCO subsidiary — CancerLinQ — will have its own 1200 square foot booth in prime real estate at the entrance to the meeting’s exhibit hall. It has received data from 48 healthcare institutions to help them improve care for patients and has compiled a treasure trove of data for researchers studying how expensive cancer drugs work for patients in the real world. But ethicists are concerned that CancerLinQ is allowing companies to sell access to the data after they have been stripped of patient identifiers, without asking for patients’ permission.

“I think that the ethics of profiting off of someone else’s information is dicey and at the very least the patient should go in with their eyes open, and that requires informing them,” said Robert Field, PhD, MPH, JD, a professor of law and public health at Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Participants’ Understanding of Informed Consent for Biobanking: A Systematic Review (Papers: Elizabeth R. Eisenhauer, et al | 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on August 7, 2019
 

Abstract
Nurses are increasingly asked to obtain consent from participants for biobanking studies. Biobanking has added unique complexities to informed consent. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate participants’ level of understanding of the information presented during the informed consent process unique to the donation of biological specimens for research. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were utilized to conduct the review. PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science, and ProQuest bibliographic databases were searched. Results indicated that elements of informed consent unique to biobanking were poorly understood. Most studies had authors or funding associated with a biobank. Only one study disclosed and assessed participants’ understanding of moral risks. Increased disclosures, values-clarification, and presenting information via multiple modalities may facilitate understanding. There is a need to improve the quality of informed consent for biobanking studies by utilizing standardized instruments, definitions, and encouraging research about informed choice outside the biobanking industry.

Keywords
biological specimen banks, biobanking, informed consent, moral risks, understanding

Eisenhauer, E. R., Tait, A. R., Rieh, S., Y. & Arslanian-Engoren, C., M. (2017) Participants’ understanding of informed consent for biobanking: a systematic review. Clinical Nursing Research. 28(1) pp30-51
Publisher: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1054773817722690

Incorporating Exclusion Clauses into Informed Consent for Biobanking (Papers: Zubin Master and David B. Resnik)0

Posted by Admin in on August 7, 2019
 

Determining how best to obtain valid consent for the use of human biological samples collected for research is a challenging issue for investigators, sponsors, and institutional review boards (IRBs) because the goals of maximizing participants’ autonomous decisionmaking and advancing scientific research may conflict. Some participants want control over their samples to avoid research projects that they find morally objectionable. In this article, we argue that the use of exclusion clauses in informed consent can minimize risks to participants and social groups and promote accountability and trust without significantly deterring research.

Exclusion clauses are written statements used during informed consent to (1) exclude the use of biological samples and personal health information for certain types of research and (2) limit sharing of biological samples and personal health information with specific researchers, biobanks, or organizations—for example, investigators working on certain types of research projects, insurance companies, government or law enforcement agencies, advocacy organizations, and private companies, that is, employers. Exclusion clauses are meant to capture contentious research that could risk discrimination or stigmatization of individuals or groups and sharing with organizations the public perceives as less trustworthy. Exclusion clauses are statements included in consent forms by the researchers on areas of contentious research in which they will not take part in the future and organizations they are unlikely to share with. Although exclusion clauses may limit unrestricted use and global sharing, they can be useful for smaller biobanks with specific purposes.

Biobanking and Informed Consent
Biobanking involves the collection of human biological materials and health information that are used for a current study and stored for future research. Samples can be tested to detect the presence of cell types, proteins, metabolites, antibodies, DNA sequences, and other biomarkers in a given population.1 With the accompanying health information of participants, investigators can analyze data derived from biological samples (such as genomic information), as well as other types of data (such as demographic and health information), to discover statistical relationships between various factors and diseases and patterns of heritability within families and populations. Sharing of biological samples is important for promoting scientific progress, because investigators can take advantage of one another’s labor and resources and can access diverse populations and include more samples in their studies. Sometimes, samples come from populations where individuals are thought to have unique genetic predispositions or environmental exposures.

MASTER, Z., & RESNIK, D. (2013). Incorporating Exclusion Clauses into Informed Consent for Biobanking. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 22(2), 203-212. doi:10.1017/S0963180112000576
Publisher: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/cambridge-quarterly-of-healthcare-ethics/article/incorporating-exclusion-clauses-into-informed-consent-for-biobanking/B73A45B1050893729219B0076EFF4D67

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