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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

(Australia) Medical journal fast-tracks free publication of COVID-19 research – ResearchProfessionalNews (Rosslyn Beeby | April 2020)0

Posted by Admin in on April 26, 2020
 

Rapid review ‘risks errors, but being too slow with information sharing is a bigger risk’

We’re seeing two encouraging signs from the COVID-19 pandemic: a marvellous sense of cooperation between researchers from around the globe; and greater respect of the analysis and warnings from researchers.  But as we’ve noted recently, there is a concern about the rush to publish and the risk of dangerous mistakes.

Australia’s leading peer-reviewed medical journal has launched a rapid online publication process for COVID-19 research papers and is providing free public access to these studies.
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The Medical Journal of Australia has introduced the changes so that “the newest data and viewpoints are released as soon as possible”.
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Nicholas Talley, the journal’s editor-in-chief, said the MJA had “stepped up to do its part in the crisis” by developing an ultra-rapid review of papers submitted to the journal.
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The preprint papers are published on the MJA website in a section called Online First.

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Data Management Expert Guide (Guidance: CESSDA | December 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on November 5, 2019
 

This guide is designed by European experts to help social science researchers make their research data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR).

You will be guided by different European experts who are – on a daily basis – busy ensuring long-term access to valuable social science datasets, available for discovery and reuse at one of the CESSDA social science data archives.

Target audience and mission
This guide is written for social science researchers who are in an early stage of practising research data management. With this guide, CESSDA wants to contribute to professionalism in data management and increase the value of research data.

Overview
If you follow the guide, you will travel through the research data lifecycle from planning, organising, documenting, processing, storing and protecting your data to sharing and publishing them. Taking the whole roundtrip will take you approximately 15 hours, however you can also hop on and off at any time.

CESSDA Training Working Group (2017 – 2018). CESSDA Data Management Expert Guide.
Bergen, Norway: CESSDA ERIC. Retrieved from https://www.cessda.eu/DMGuide

Embassy of Good Science (Resources | May 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on July 5, 2019
 

Your platform for research integrity and ethics
The Embassy offers help to anyone seeking support in handling day-to-day research practices and dilemmas.

The goal of The Embassy of Good Science is to promote research integrity among all those involved in research. The platform is open to anyone willing to learn or support others in fostering understanding and awareness around Good Science.

The Embassy aims to become a unique ‘go to’ place, a public square where the community of researchers can gather to discuss ‘hot topics’, share knowledge, and find guidance and support to perform science responsibly and with integrity.

Access the Embassy of Good Science
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Why journal editors should dig deeper when authors ask for a retraction – Retraction Watch (Ivan Oransky | February 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on March 2, 2019
 

Imagine you’re a journal editor. A group of authors sends you a request to retract one of their papers, saying that “during figure assembly certain images were inappropriately processed.”

What do you do next? Do you ask some tough questions about just what “inappropriately processed” means? Do you check your files for whether the author’s institution had told you about an investigation into the work? Do you Google the author’s names? Do you…search Retraction Watch?

It seems unlikely that any of those things happened in the case of a recent retraction from Nature Communications, or, if they did, they don’t seem to have informed the notice. We don’t know for sure, because, as is typical, the journal isn’t saying much. But here’s what we do know.

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