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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

A bibliometric analysis of privacy and ethics in IEEE Security and Privacy (Papers: Jonathan Tse et al 2015)0

Posted by Admin in on May 24, 2016
 

Abstract: The increasingly ubiquitous use of technology has led to the concomitant rise of intensified data collection and the ethical issues associated with the privacy and security of that data. In order to address the question of how these ethical concerns are discussed in the literature surrounding the subject, we examined articles published in IEEE Security and Privacy, a magazine targeted towards a general, technically-oriented readership spanning both academia and industry. Our investigation of the intersection between the ethical and technological dimensions of privacy and security is structured as a bibliometric analysis. Our dataset covers all articles published in IEEE Security and Privacy since its inception in 2003 to February 06, 2014 . This venue was chosen not only because of its target readership, but also because a preliminary search of keywords related to ethics, privacy, and security topics in the ISI Web of Knowledge and IEEE Xplore indicated that IEEE Security and Privacy has published a preponderance of articles matching those topics. In fact, our search returned two-fold more articles for IEEE Security and Privacy than the next most prolific venue. These reasons, coupled with the fact that both academia and industry are well-represented in the authorship of articles makes IEEE Security and Privacy an excellent candidate for bibliometric analysis. Our analysis examines the ways articles in IEEE Security and Privacy relate ethics to information technology. Such articles can influence the development of law, policy and the future of information technology ethics. We employed thematic and JK-biplot analyses of content relating privacy and ethics and found eight dominant themes as well as the inter-theme relationships. Authors and institutional affiliations were examined to discern whether centers of research activity and/or authors dominated the overall field or thematic areas. Results suggest avenues for future work in critical areas, especially for closing present gaps in the coverage of ethics and information technology privacy and security themes particularly in the areas of ethics and privacy awareness.

Keywords: Ethics Privacy Education

Tse J, Schrader DE,  Ghosh D, Liao T, Lundie D (2015) A bibliometric analysis of privacy and ethics in IEEE Security and Privacy. Ethics and Information Technology. 17(2) pp 153-163
Publisher: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10676-015-9369-6

National Centre for Indigenous Genomics0

Posted by Admin in on May 24, 2016
 

We were blown away by this resource and this fantastic video. It is a wonderful example of how to explain the essence of complex research. The depth and skill of cultural communication is worthy of praise, recognition and is worth emulating.

“The National Centre for Indigenous Genomics (NCIG) aims to create a repository of Indigenous biospecimens, genomic data and documents for research and other uses that benefit Indigenous donors, their communities and descendants, the broader Indigenous community and the general Australian community.
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“About NCIG: an introduction for donor communities – This is the first of several animations NCIG is developing to assist consultation and engagement between the Centre and donor communities. This introductory film explains the origins of the NCIG collection, and its potential in the context of modern scientific and medical research.
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“This animation was collaboratively developed by representatives of NCIG’s Research Advisory Committee, with valuable input from the team at the Machado Joseph Disease Foundation and Browndog Productions. It was funded by The Canberra Medical Society.”

Access the web site

Australian retraction – Researchers decry study warning of low-carb diet risks (Retraction Watch May 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on May 19, 2016
 

[An Australian was a coauthor of this retracted paper.]

Advocates of low-carbohydrate diet are voicing concern about a recent paper that suggested the diet could cause weight gain, contrary to previous research. One expert has even called for its retraction.

The study, published in Nutrition & Diabetes in February, also found that the low-carb diet did little to prevent the progression of type 2 diabetes. Researchers have since criticized the study for drawing these conclusions based on data from a handful of mice, using a poor proxy for the human version of the diet.

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In major shift, medical journal to publish protocols along with clinical trials – Retraction Watch (Alison McCook May 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on May 17, 2016
 

A major medical journal has updated its instructions to authors, now requiring that they publish protocols of clinical trials, along with any changes made along the way.

We learned of this change via the COMPare project, which has been tracking trial protocol changes in major medical journals — and been critical of the Annals of Internal Medicine‘s response to those changes. However, Darren Taichman, the executive deputy editor of the journal, told us the journal’s decision to publish trial protocols was a long time coming:

This change was something we planned prior to COMPARE and were intending to implement with an update of our online journal that is in process. However, the barrier COMPARE encountered in obtaining a protocol for one of the studies in their audit prompted us to implement it earlier.

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