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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

The Ethics Trapeze (Papers: Will C. van den Hoonaard 2006)0

Posted by Admin in on March 22, 2016
 

Abstract: This article constitutes the introduction to a collection of essays in volume 4 of JAE, representing an extremely diverse collection of pieces written by authors from equally diverse backgrounds with the purpose of sharing the theoretical and practical issues related to research-ethics, or on ethics more generally. All of the articles are fresh contributions to the research-ethics review debate. The 17 authors of the 12 articles come from the United States, South Africa, and Canada. Their disciplinary or research backgrounds include Aboriginal literatures, English literature, English-as-a Second-Language pedagogy, French literature, history, language and literacy, liberal arts, and linguistics – all fields in the cluster of the humanities. The volume also has contributions from social work, sociology, and speech pathology. The world of research-ethics review has become so pervasive that it invades all areas of research: it does not respect disciplinary boundaries. The articles in this special volume represent, in short, a microscope of the research world.

Key words: ethics in research humanities and ethics research-ethics review

van den Hoonaard, Will C (2006) The Ethics Trapeze. Journal of Academic Ethics. 4(1) pp 1-10
Publisher: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10805-006-9026-0

Consent and confidentiality in the light of recent demands for data sharing (Papers: Garrath Williams and Iris Pigeot )0

Posted by Admin in on March 20, 2016
 

Abstract: Many attempts have been made to formalize ethical requirements for research. Among the most prominent mechanisms are informed consent requirements and data protection regimes. These mechanisms, however, sometimes appear as obstacles to research. In this opinion paper, we critically discuss conventional approaches to research ethics that emphasize consent and data protection. Several recent debates have highlighted other important ethical issues and underlined the need for greater openness in order to uphold the integrity of health-related research. Some of these measures, such as the sharing of individual-level data, pose problems for standard understandings of consent and privacy. Here, we argue that these interpretations tend to be overdemanding: They do not really protect research subjects and they hinder the research process. Accordingly, we suggest another way of framing these requirements. Individual consent must be situated alongside the wider distribution of knowledge created when the actions, commitments, and procedures of researchers and their institutions are opened to scrutiny. And instead of simply emphasizing privacy or data protection, we should understand confidentiality as a principle that facilitates the sharing of information while upholding important safeguards. Consent and confidentiality belong to a broader set of safeguards and procedures to uphold the integrity of the research process.

Keywords: Data protection; Ethical review; Informed consent; Privacy; Research ethics; Trustworthiness

Williams G & Pigeot I (2016) Consent and confidentiality in the light of recent demands for data sharing. Biometrical Journal. doi: 10.1002/bimj.201500044
Publisher: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bimj.201500044/abstract

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process “Evidence-based medicine has been hijacked:” A confession from John Ioannidis (Author interview by Retraction Watch)0

Posted by Admin in on March 17, 2016
 

“John Ioannidis is perhaps best known for a 2005 paper “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False.” One of the most highly cited researchers in the world, Ioannidis, a professor at Stanford, has built a career in the field of meta-research. Earlier this month, he published a heartfelt and provocative essay in the the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology titled “Evidence-Based Medicine Has Been Hijacked: A Report to David Sackett.” In it, he carries on a conversation begun in 2004 with Sackett, who died last May and was widely considered the father of evidence-based medicine. We asked Ioannidis to expand on his comments in the essay, including why he believes he is a “failure.”

Click here to read the interview by Retraction Watch

Essentials of Thinking Ethically in Qualitative Research (Qualitative Essentials) (Books: Will C. van den Hoonaard and Deborah K van den Hoonaard 2013)0

Posted by Admin in on March 15, 2016
 

About: Ethical dimensions of qualitative research are constantly emerging and shifting. This volume identifies relevant ethical principles that can guide novice researchers through the research process with the necessary wisdom and insight to shape a project in sound, meaningful, and thoughtful ways. Well known for their work in this area, the van den Hoonaards outline the domains on which ethics most often impinge. They address key ethical issues arising in different qualitative traditions and contexts. The volume concludes with guidance on how to navigate formal ethics reviews. Many key examples and other resources help the student engage the complicated literature on this topic.

van den Hoonaard, Will C, and van den Hoonaard, D K (2013) Essentials of Thinking Ethically in Qualitative Research (Qualitative Essentials). Left Coast Press, ISBN: 978-1-61132-204-0/978-1-61132-205-7/978-1-61132-714-4
Review: http://www.socresonline.org.uk/19/4/reviews/2.html
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Essentials-Thinking-Ethically-Qualitative-Research/dp/1611322057

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