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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

One in 25 papers contains inappropriately duplicated images, screen finds – Retraction Watch (Cat Ferguson April 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on April 22, 2016
 

Excerpt: Elisabeth Bik, a microbiologist at Stanford, has for years been a behind-the-scenes force in scientific integrity, anonymously submitting reports on plagiarism and image duplication to journal editors. Now, she’s ready to come out of the shadows.

With the help of two editors at microbiology journals, she has conducted a massive study looking for image duplication and manipulation in 20,621 published papers. Bik and co-authors Arturo Casadevall and Ferric Fang (a board member of our parent organization) found 782 instances of inappropriate image duplication, including 196 published papers containing “duplicated figures with alteration.” The study is being released as a pre-print on bioArxiv.

An example the paper uses of “duplication with alteration” is this Western blot where a band has been duplicated:

Click here to read more

Pharmacology journal pulls paper because third party “compromised” peer review – Retraction Watch (Dalmeet Singh Chawla April 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on April 19, 2016
 

We don’t usually report retractions of papers where one of the authors are not based in Australia or New Zealand but we felt that this case provided a useful precautionary tale for research integrity and the use of third party service providers.

“The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology (BCP) has retracted a 2015 paper about treating heart failure after deciding its peer review process had been compromised.

This paper is one of the many we’ve noticed lately that have been felled by the actions of a “third party” — in this case, a manuscript editing company called EditPub.

The newly retracted paper, “rhBNP therapy can improve clinical outcomes and reduce in-hospital mortality compared with dobutamine in heart failure patients: a meta-analysis,” has not yet been cited, according to Thomson Reuters Web of Science.”

Read the full post here

Bruce Murdoch: Former University of Queensland professor given suspended sentence for fraud – Courier Mail (Melanie Petrinec 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on April 1, 2016
 

“A FORMER University of Queensland professor who faked a breakthrough study on Parkinson’s disease giving sufferers false hope has been given a two-year suspended sentence for a string of fraud-related charges. Professor Bruce Murdoch falsified a research paper, which was published in the high-profile European Journal of Neurology, between 2011 and 2014. He pleaded guilty to 17 fraud-related charges and was sentenced in the Brisbane Magistrates Court on Thursday morning.”

Melanie Petrinec. Bruce Murdoch: Former University of Queensland professor given suspended sentence for fraud. Courier Mail, 31 March 2016,
http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/crime-and-justice/bruce-murdoch-former-university-of-queensland-professor-given-suspended-sentence-for-fraud/news-story/25b07fcce3a8210f48a260a0d7d230eb

This latest development has also been reported by Retraction Watch – Neuroscientist pleads guilty in court to fraud, gets two-year suspended sentence.

And was reported in the Brisbane Times on 5 April 2016 – http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/technology/sci-tech/australian-neuroscientist-bruce-murdoch-nearly-went-to-jail-for-making-up-data-20160404-gnydf6.html

Denmark and Sweden take another look at how they investigate scientific misconduct – ScienceNordic (Catherine Jex 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on March 31, 2016
 

“A series of scandals in Nordic science in recent years has forced Denmark and Sweden to rethink how they investigate allegations of research misconduct–often referred to as academic fraud.

In November last year, the Swedish Ministry of Education and Research launched an inquiry into how other countries are handling academic fraud, and to assess the role of the independent board of reviewers who currently investigate such allegations.

Simultaneously with the launch of the Swedish inquiry, the Danish Ministry of Higher Education and Science published 12 recommendations to improve the handling of such allegations in Denmark–first by refining their definition on what actually constitutes scientific misconduct.”

Catherine Jex. Denmark and Sweden take another look at how they investigate scientific misconduct. ScienceNordic, 27 March 2016,
http://sciencenordic.com/denmark-and-sweden-take-another-look-how-they-investigate-scientific-misconduct

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