ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Office for the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC)0

Posted by Admin in on May 30, 2015
 

“The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) is an independent statutory agency within the Attorney General’s portfolio. The OAIC liaises with the Business and Information Law Branch, part of the Civil Law Division within the Civil Justice and Legal Services Group of the Attorney General’s Department (AGD).”

The website incorporates links to the Commonwealth Act and regulation, information about the regulatory framework (including the Australian Privacy Principles) and other useful information.

International Journal for Internet Research Ethics0

Posted by Admin in on May 30, 2015
 

“The IJIRE is the first peer-reviewed online journal, dedicated specifically to cross-disciplinary, cross-cultural research on Internet Research Ethics. All disciplinary perspectives, from those in the arts and humanities, to the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences, are reflected in the journal.

With the emergence of Internet use as a research locale and tool throughout the 1990s, researchers from disparate disciplines, ranging from the social sciences to humanities to the sciences, have found a new fertile ground for research opportunities that differ greatly from their traditional biomedical counterparts. As such, “populations,” locales, and spaces that had no corresponding physical environment became a focal point, or site of research activity. Human subjects protections questions then began to arise, across disciplines and over time: What about privacy? How is informed consent obtained? What about research on minors? What are “harms” in an online environment? Is this really human subjects work? More broadly, are the ethical obligations of researchers conducting research online somehow different from other forms of research ethics practices?

As Internet Research Ethics has developed as its own field and discipline, additional questions have emerged: How do diverse methodological approaches result in distinctive ethical conflicts – and, possibly, distinctive ethical resolutions? How do diverse cultural and legal traditions shape what are perceived as ethical conflicts and permissible resolutions? How do researchers collaborating across diverse ethical and legal domains recognize and resolve ethical issues in ways that recognize and incorporate often markedly different ethical understandings?”

Will all the ethical social scientists please stand up? – The Conversation (Mark Israel 2014)0

Posted by Admin in on May 30, 2015
 

“Social scientists have to get better at recognising and responding to ethical problems. Although economists, political scientists and psychologists have not been responsible for the same level of abuses that have occurred in biomedical research, the social sciences have witnessed their share of old-fashioned scandalous behaviour.

Social scientists were co-opted into American intelligence and military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Political scientists at Stanford University and Dartmouth College involved in experimentation on voter participation may have disrupted judicial elections in Montana. Harvard sociologists studying Facebook failed to protect the anonymity of their students.”

Control And Contingency: Maintaining Ethical Stances In Research, International Journal of Internet Research Ethics (Journal: Natasha Whiteman 2010)0

Posted by Admin in on May 30, 2015
 

JOURNAL: Whiteman, Natasha. “Control and contingency: Maintaining ethical stances in research.” International Journal of Internet Research Ethics 3.1 (2010): 6-22.

Abstract:
Drawing from the author’s experience of carrying out observational research in two online communities, this paper explores the instability of localised research ethics. The paper presents a framework for conceptualising the ongoing production and destabilisation of ethical stances in research, arguing that such destabilisation can be productive, provoking methodological/ethical learning.

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