ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Resource Library

Research Ethics MonthlyAbout Us

ResourcesResearch ethics committees

Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Constructive Voices: Panel discussion about institutional implementation of the National Statement (2007 updated 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on November 24, 2018
 

On 22nd of november, AHRECS hosted its second Constructive Voices panel. These panels aim to create an opportunity for open discussion about human research ethics and research integrity among researchers, policymakers, research managers, research ethics reviewers and other stakeholders.

The first panel featured:

  • Jeremy Kenner, Expert Advisor – Ethics at NHMRC
  • Wendy Rogers, Chair NSWG, Macquarie University
  • Pamela Henry, Chair ECU HREC
  • Gary Allen, Co-Chair Chapter 3.1 drafting committeer,  Senior Consultant, AHRECS

A video-recording of the discussion will be available for streaming for 90 days for free from the here. It will then be moved to the AHRECS subscribers’ area.

By becoming a subscriber (from USD1/month) you will not only gain access to a growing library of high-quality resources (two or more items are added every month), but you will also be supporting events like the Constructive Voices panel discussions. A subscription of USD15/month provides access to all the materials.

We are also happy to hear ideas for panels and speakers for 2019. We agree that there is a need for communities of practice to develop further around research ethics. We recognise that AHRECS could do more to stimulate this and we would like to find partners who would resource this.

AHRECS has been working with Australian universities and other research institutions to respond to the recent changes to the National Statement and the new Australian Code. You can find out more about the services offered by AHRECS at https://ahrecs.com/our-services.

Regards from Mark, Gary and Colin on behalf of the AHRECS team

Items left by the speakers

Mark’s welcome and intro slides

— NHMRC —

Jeremy’s presentation slides

Jeremy’s full version slides

National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007 Updated 2018)

— WENDY ROGERS —

Wendy’s presentation

— PAMELA HENRY —

Pamela’s presentation

— GARY ALLEN —

Gary’s slides

Recording of event

Ethical relationships, ethical research in Aboriginal contexts: Perspectives from central Australia0

Posted by Admin in on November 18, 2018
 

Learning Communities International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts
Special issue: Ethical relationships, ethical research in Aboriginal contexts: Perspectives from central Australia

Number 23 – November 2018

CONTENTS
Introduction to Special Issue: Being here matters …2
Barry Judd

Editorial….12
Al Strangeways

“You helped us and now we’re going to all help you”: What we learned about how to do research together …16
Lisa Hall, Linda Anderson, Fiona Gibson, Mona Kantawara, Barbara Martin and Yamurna Oldfield

Ngapartji ngapartji ninti and koorliny karnya quoppa katitjin (Respectful and ethical research in central Australia and the south west) …32
Jennie Buchanan, Len Collard and Dave Palmer

Researching together: Reflections on ethical research in remote Aboriginal communities …52
Tessa Benveniste and Lorraine King

The dancing trope of cross-cultural language education policy…64
Janine Oldfield and Vincent Forrester

Different monsters: Traversing the uneasy dialectic of institutional and relational ethics …76
Al Strangeways and Lisa Papatraianou

Research for social impact and the contra-ethic of national frameworks…92
Judith Lovell Altyerre

NOW: Arrernte dreams for national reconstruction in the 21st century …106
Joel Liddle Perrurle and Barry Judd

The making of Monstrous Breaches: An ethical global visual narrative…116
Judith Lovell and Kathleen Kemarre Wallace

Read  the special edition

The ‘problem’ of undesigned relationality: Ethnographic fieldwork, dual roles and research ethics (Papers: Kirsten Bell | 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on October 28, 2018
 

Abstract

This October 2018 paper reflects on an area of research which continues to be a source of tension between at least some researchers* and research ethics reviewers: Is it a problem, or an advantage or in fact sometimes a necessity that there be an existing connection between participant and researcher. *Especially for ethnographers and anthropologists who might feel they are being held to a biomedical standard that is irrelevant and useless for their work. We have included links to a trove of related items in the Resource Library.

Perhaps the most unique feature of ethnographic fieldwork is the distinctive form of relationality it entails, where the ethnographer’s identity as a researcher is not fixed in the way typical of most other forms of research. In this paper, I explore how this ‘undesigned relationality’ is understood, both in procedural ethics frameworks and by the different disciplines that have come to claim a stake in the ‘method’ itself. Demonstrating that the ethical issues it entails are primarily conceptualized via the lens of the ‘dual role’, I use this as a means of exploring the ideal relationship between researcher and subject that procedural ethics frameworks are premised upon. I go on to explore the epistemological differences in ways that ethnographers themselves understand and respond to the multiple forms of relationality that characterize fieldwork and the challenge this poses to the possibility of a pan-disciplinary consensus on ethnographic research ethics.
.

Keywords
ethnography, research ethics, dual roles, disciplinarity, relationality
.

Bell, K. (2018). The ‘problem’ of undesigned relationality: Ethnographic fieldwork, dual roles and research ethics. Ethnography. https://doi.org/10.1177/1466138118807236

Who Says You Need Permission to Study Yourself? – NEO.LIFE (Emily Mullin | September 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on October 16, 2018
 

Sara Riggare can’t finish her PhD because an ethics committee says she needed their approval first.

For the past six years, Sara Riggare, who has Parkinson’s disease, has been conducting research on herself as part of her PhD at the prestigious Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Using mobile apps, she tracks her symptoms, sleep, and activity.

She’s not unique in doing so: Many people self-monitor with apps and wearable devices like Fitbit and the Apple Watch, a trend spurred by the broader Quantified Self movement, where “lifeloggers” track everything from their blood sugar to their microbiome, and even carry out experiments on themselves.

For the past six years, Sara Riggare, who has Parkinson’s disease, has been conducting research on herself as part of her PhD at the prestigious Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Using mobile apps, she tracks her symptoms, sleep, and activity.

Read the rest of this discussion piece

0