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China to tighten rules on gene editing in humans – Nature (David Cyranoski | March 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on March 21, 2019
 

In the wake of the gene-edited-baby scandal, scientists and institutions could face tough penalties for breaking the rules.

China’s health ministry has issued draft regulations that will restrict the use of gene editing in humans, just three months after Chinese researcher He Jiankui announced that twin girls had been born with edited genomes. The proposal includes severe penalties for those who break the rules. If approved, scientists say the policy could have gains and drawbacks for research.

The draft regulations, issued by the National Health Commission on 26 February, state that gene editing in any type of cell that will end up in humans, including embryos, will need the commission’s approval, as will other high-risk biomedical procedures.

The regulations come in response to He’s claim, in late November, that he used the gene-editing technology CRISPR–Cas9 to alter the genomes of embryos — a process known as germline editing — to make them resistant to HIV. He then implanted the edited embryos into women. News that twin girls had been born as a result of these experiments prompted an international outcry about He’s use of a risky and unproven technology.

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Organ transplants from executed Chinese prisoners and research ethics – Radio National ABC (Norman Swan | February 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on March 5, 2019
 

Macquarie University researchers say hundreds of journal papers in the transplant field don’t follow ethical guidelines in declaring whether or not their research includes transplants from executed prisoners in China.

The researchers want the papers retracted, saying it creates a moral hazard for the entire field of research.

Guest:
Professor Wendy Rogers

Access the page | Download/stream the audio | Access the transcript

The Ethics Ecosystem: Personal Ethics, Network Governance and Regulating Actors Governing the Use of Social Media Research Data (Papers: Gabrielle Samuel, et al | February 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on March 4, 2019
 

Abstract

While this paper is most obviously relevant to countries without a national standard for non-health human research (ie it might seem more useful for New Zealand) than Australia, it does point to institutions having nuanced guidance about the use of Web 2.0 material.
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AHRECS can provide an in-meeting briefing for our HREC/REC that would be 15min pre-recorded presentation (ppt with embedded audio), a video/phone connection for questions and discussion, and a short briefing note, which includes a recommended reading list. The cost of this activity is AUD 900. Send an email to inmeeting@ahrecs.com to find out more.

This paper examines the consequences of a culture of “personal ethics” when using new methodologies, such as the use of social media (SM) sites as a source of data for research. Using SM research as an example, this paper explores the practices of a number of actors and researchers within the “Ethics Ecosystem” which as a network governs ethically responsible research behaviour. In the case of SM research, the ethical use of this data is currently in dispute, as even though it is seemingly publically available, concerns relating to privacy, vulnerability, potential harm and consent blur the lines of responsible ethical research behaviour. The findings point to the dominance of a personal, bottom-up, researcher-led, ‘ethical barometer’ for making decisions regarding the permissibility of using SM data. We show that the use of different barometers by different researchers can lead to wide disparities in ethical practice – disparities which are compounded by the lack of firm guidelines for responsible practice of SM research. This has widespread consequences on the development of shared norms and understandings at all levels, and by all actors within the Ethics Ecosystem, and risks inconsistencies in their approaches to ethical decision-making. This paper argues that this governance of ethical behaviour by individual researchers perpetuates a negative cycle of academic practice that is dependent on subjective judgements by researchers themselves, rather than governed by more formalised academic institutions such as the research ethics committee and funding council guidelines.
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Keywords
Evaluation Governance, Research ethics, Social media, Ethics Internet research
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Samuel, G., Derrick, G.E. & van Leeuwen, T. Minerva. (2019). “The Ethics Ecosystem: Personal Ethics, Network Governance and Regulating Actors Governing the Use of Social Media Research Data.” Minerva.
Publisher (Open Access): https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11024-019-09368-3

Call for retraction of 400 scientific papers amid fears organs came from Chinese prisoners – The Guardian (Melissa Davey | February 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on March 2, 2019
 

Study finds failure of English language medical journals to comply with international ethical standards

A world-first study has called for the mass retraction of more than 400 scientific papers on organ transplantation, amid fears the organs were obtained unethically from Chinese prisoners.

The Australian-led study exposes a mass failure of English language medical journals to comply with international ethical standards in place to ensure organ donors provide consent for transplantation.

The study was published on Wednesday in the medical journal BMJ Open. Its author, the professor of clinical ethics Wendy Rogers, said journals, researchers and clinicians who used the research were complicit in “barbaric” methods of organ procurement.

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