ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)
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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

The University of Minnesota’s Medical Research Mess – New York Times (Carl Elliot 2015)0

Posted by Admin in on May 28, 2015
 

“MINNEAPOLIS — IF you want to see just how long an academic institution can tolerate a string of slow, festering research scandals, let me invite you to the University of Minnesota, where I teach medical ethics.

“Over the past 25 years, our department of psychiatry has been party to the following disgraces: a felony conviction and a Food and Drug Administration research disqualification for a psychiatrist guilty of fraud in a drug study; the F.D.A. disqualification of another psychiatrist, for enrolling illiterate Hmong refugees in a drug study without their consent; the suspended license of yet another psychiatrist, who was charged with “reckless, if not willful, disregard” for dozens of patients; and, in 2004, the discovery, in a halfway house bathroom, of the near-decapitated corpse of Dan Markingson, a seriously mentally ill young man under an involuntary commitment order who committed suicide after enrolling, over the objections of his mother, in an industry-funded antipsychotic study run by members of the department.”

Indemnity and consent guidelines – Medicines Australia0

Posted by Admin in on May 28, 2015
 

Guidelines for the Ethical use of Digital Data in Human Research0

Posted by Admin in on May 28, 2015
 

Clark, K. Duckham, M. Guillemin, M. Hunter, A. McVernon, J. O’Keefe, C. Pitkin, C. Prawer, S. Sinnott, R. Warr, D. Waycott, J. (2015) Guidelines for the Ethical use of Digital Data in Human Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne.0.

“The guidelines presented here have been developed to assist researchers who are conducting, and ethics committee members who are assessing, research involving digital data. Digital data presents researchers and ethics committees with familiar and novel ethical issues. Accepted strategies for managing issues such as privacy and confidentiality, and informed consent, need rethinking. The qualities of digital data, including its mobility and replicability, present new kinds of ethical issues which emerge in relation to data governance, data security and data management”.

Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (GERAIS)0

Posted by Admin in on May 27, 2015
 

Published by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. This resource was first published in 2002 and was updated in 2010 and 2012. The guidelines outline 15 principles which should inform the conception, design, conduct and reporting the results of research Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Arguably the principles discussed in the GERAIS document are a far more useful reference for research outside of the health sciences compared to the NHMRC’s Values and Ethics guidelines.

“Indigenous peoples have inherent rights, including the right to self-determination. The principles in these Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies are founded on respect for these rights, including rights to full and fair participation in any processes, projects and activities that impact on them, and the right to control and maintain their culture and heritage. AIATSIS considers that these principles are not only a matter of ethical research practice but of human rights.

“It is essential that Indigenous people are full participants in research projects that concern them, share an understanding of the aims and methods of the research, and share the results of this work. At every stage, research with and about Indigenous peoples must be founded on a process of meaningful engagement and reciprocity between the researcher and Indigenous people. It should also be recognised that there is no sharp distinction between researchers and Indigenous people. Indigenous people are also researchers, and all participants must be regarded as equal partners in a research engagement.”

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