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Research Ethics in an Unethical World: The Politics and Morality of Engaged Research (Claudio Morrison and Devi Sacchetto | October 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on January 14, 2020
 

Abstract
This article explores ethical dilemmas in researching the world of work. Recent contributions to Work, employment and society have highlighted challenges for engaged research. Based on the emancipatory epistemologies of Bourdieu, Gramsci and Burawoy, the authors examine moral challenges in workplace fieldwork, question the assumptions of mainstream ethics discourses and seek to identify an alternative approach. Instead of an ethics premised on a priori, universal precepts that treasure academic neutrality, this article recognises a morality that responds to the social context of research with participation and commitment. The reflection in this study is based on fieldwork conducted in the former Soviet Union. Transformation societies present challenges to participatory ethnography but simultaneously provide considerable opportunities for developing an ethics of truth. An approach that can guide engaged researchers through social conflict’s ‘messy’ reality should hinge on loyalty to the emancipation struggles of those engaged in it.

Keywords
business and management research, ethics, materialism, post-socialism, qualitative fieldwork, workplace morality

Morrison, C., & Sacchetto, D. (2018). Research Ethics in an Unethical World: The Politics and Morality of Engaged Research. Work, Employment and Society, 32(6), 1118–1129. https://doi.org/10.1177/0950017017726947
Publisher: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0950017017726947#articleCitationDownloadContainer

Google health-data scandal spooks researchers – Science (Heidi Ledford | November 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on January 12, 2020
 

Scientists fear the controversy over the Nightingale project will undermine trust in research.

Google and one of the largest health-care networks in the United States are embroiled in a data-privacy controversy that researchers fear could jeopardize public trust in data-sharing practices and, potentially, academic studies.

At issue is a project dubbed Nightingale that gives Google access to the health-care information, including names and other identifiable data, of tens of millions of people without their knowledge. The people were treated at facilities run by the health network Ascension, which is based in St Louis, Missouri.

Google says that Nightingale, first reported in The Wall Street Journal on 11 November, is meant to develop technology that would enable Ascension to deliver improved health care.

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Friday afternoon’s funny – Research during a disaster0

Posted by Admin in on January 10, 2020
 

Cartoon by Don Mayne www.researchcartoons.com
Full-size image for printing (right mouse click and save file)

In the context of more frequent and severe climate-change-fuelled natural disasters, researchers need to be empathetic and respectful of the context in which our projects are conducted.  AHRECS sympathies and best wishes go out to anyone affected by the current mega-fires or other disasters.

China Uses DNA to Map Faces, With Help From the West – New York Times ( Sui-Lee Wee & Paul Mozur | December 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on January 9, 2020
 

TUMXUK, China — In a dusty city in the Xinjiang region on China’s western frontier, the authorities are testing the rules of science.

Does your institutional guidance material speak to situations such as this, including secondary use that could present a risk to a population of people?  Do you have mechanisms to manage institutional conflicts of interest?  If not, this story highlights why such arrangements could be important.

With a million or more ethnic Uighurs and others from predominantly Muslim minority groups swept up in detentions across Xinjiang, officials in Tumxuk have gathered blood samples from hundreds of Uighurs — part of a mass DNA collection effort dogged by questions about consent and how the data will be used.
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In Tumxuk, at least, there is a partial answer: Chinese scientists are trying to find a way to use a DNA sample to create an image of a person’s face.
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The technology, which is also being developed in the United States and elsewhere, is in the early stages of development and can produce rough pictures good enough only to narrow a manhunt or perhaps eliminate suspects. But given the crackdown in Xinjiang, experts on ethics in science worry that China is building a tool that could be used to justify and intensify racial profiling and other state discrimination against Uighurs.
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