ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)
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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Too Much Information: Visual Research Ethics in the Age of Wearable Cameras (Tze Ming Mok, et al 2014)0

Posted by Admin in on February 11, 2016
 

Abstract: When everything you see is data, what ethical principles apply? This paper argues that first-person digital recording technologies challenge traditional institutional approaches to research ethics, but that this makes ethics governance more important, not less so. We review evolving ethical concerns across four fields: Visual ethics; ubiquitous computing; mobile health; and grey literature from applied or market research. Collectively, these bodies of literature identify new challenges to traditional notions of informed consent, anonymity, confidentiality, privacy, beneficence and maleficence. Challenges come from the ever-increasing power, breadth and multi-functional integration of recording technologies, and the ubiquity and normalization of their use by participants. Some authors argue that these evolving relationships mean that institutional ethics governance procedures are irrelevant or no longer apply. By contrast, we argue that the fundamental principles of research ethics frameworks have become even more important for the protection of research participants, and that institutional frameworks need to adapt to keep pace with the ever-increasing power of recording technologies and the consequent risks to privacy. We conclude with four recommendations for efforts to ensure that contemporary visual recording research is held appropriately accountable to ethical standards: (i) minimizing the detail, scope, integration and retention of captured data, and limiting its accessibility; (ii) formulating an approach to ethics that takes in both the ‘common rule’ approaches privileging anonymity and confidentiality together with principles of contextual judgement and consent as an ongoing process; (iii) developing stronger ethical regulation of research outside academia; (iv) engaging the public and research participants in the development of ethical guidelines.

Keywords: Ethics Digital research Ubiquitous computing Research governance Visual ethics Privacy Wearable cameras

Tze Ming Mok, Flora Cornish, Jen Tarr (2014) Too Much Information: Visual Research Ethics in the Age of Wearable Cameras. Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science. 2(49). Available at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270001375_Too_Much_Information_Visual_Research_Ethics_in_the_Age_of_Wearable_Cameras (accessed 11 February 2016)
Publisher: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12124-014-9289-8

Academic Guidance in Medical Student Research: How Well Do Supervisors and Students Understand the Ethics of Human Research? (Papers: K M Weston, et al 2015)0

Posted by Admin in on February 8, 2016
 

Abstract: Research is increasingly recognised as a key component of medical curricula,offering a range of benefits including development of skills in evidence-based medicine.The literature indicates that experienced academic supervision or mentoring is important in any research activity and positively influences research output. The aim of this project was to investigate the human research ethics experiences and knowledge of three groups: medical students, and university academic staff and clinicians eligible to supervise medical student research projects; at two Australian universities. Training in research ethics was low amongst academic staff and clinicians eligible to supervise medical student research. Only two-thirds of academic staff (67.9 %) and students (65.7 %) and less than half of clinicians surveyed(47.1 %;p=0.014) indicated that specific patient consent was required for a doctor to include patient medical records within a research publication. There was limited awareness of requirements for participant information and consent forms amongst all groups. In the case of clinical trials, fewer clinicians (88.4 %) and students (83.3 %) than academics (100 %) indicated there was a requirement to obtain consent (p=0.009). Awareness of the ethics committee focus on respect was low across all groups. This project has identified significant gaps in human research ethics understanding among medical students, and university academic staff and clinicians. The incorporation of research within medical curricula provides the impetus for medical schools and their institutions to ensure that academic staff and clinicians who are eligible and qualified to supervise students’ research projects are appropriately trained in human research ethics

Keywords: Research ethics.Medical student.Medical school.Curriculum.Ethics committee

Weston K M, Mullan J, Hu W, Thomson C, Rich W, Knight-Billington P, Marjadi B, McLennan P (2015)Academic Guidance in Medical Student Research: How Well Do Supervisors and Students Understand the Ethics of Human Research?. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-16. Available at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/284247018_Academic_Guidance_in_Medical_Student_Research_How_Well_Do_Supervisors_and_Students_Understand_the_Ethics_of_Human_Research (accessed 8 February 2016)
Publisher: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10805-015-9248-0

Applying “Place” to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence/Humility Training (Papers: Dianne P Quigley 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on February 4, 2016
 

Abstract: Research ethics principles and regulations typically have been applied to the protection of individual human subjects. Yet, new paradigms of research that include the place-based community and cultural groups as partners or participants of environmental research interventions, in particular, require attention to place-based identities and geographical contexts. This paper argues the importance of respecting “place” within human subjects protections applied to communities and cultural groups as part of a critical need for research ethics and cultural competence training for graduate research students. These protections and benefits are extensions of the Belmont Principles and have been included in recent recommendations from research regulatory committees.

Keywords: Human subjects Beneficence Justice Group protections Cultural competence Community-based research Bioethical principles

Quigley D (2016) Applying “Place” to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence/Humility Training. Journal of Academic Ethics March 2016, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 19-33 (First online 13 January 2016, Accessed 5 February) http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10805-015-9251-5

I’m Okay, You’re Okay?: Reflections on the Well-Being and Ethical Requirements of Researchers and Research Participants in Conducting Qualitative Fieldwork Interviews (Papers: Wendy Mitchell and Annie Irvine 2008)0

Posted by Admin in on February 3, 2016
 

Abstract: In this paper the authors present their reflections on a U.K. government–funded study exploring mental health and employment. Conducting research on a sensitive theme with a potentially vulnerable group gave renewed focus to some social research issues, including consent and control, rapport building, managing and responding to emotion, and offering appropriate longer term support. The researchers discuss their personal approaches and experiences (practical, methodological, ethical) during and after the fieldwork process. In the paper the authors highlight some of the challenges they faced and discuss how these were addressed and managed, sometimes differently, and not always resolved. They demonstrate the need for researchers to be aware of their “research footprint,” in particular the need to be reflexive and responsive to participants’ emotional well-being, and for funders and employers to also be sensitive to and mindful of the demands of social research, including impacts on researchers’ well-being.

Keywords: fieldwork practice, face-to-face interviews, participant well-being, researcher well-being, interview reciprocity, research footprint

Authors’ note:  We thank the 40 people who participated in interviews with us for the Mental Health and Employment study. Each one of them made a valuable contribution to project. We would also like to thank Simon Gilbody, Professor of Psychological Medicine and Health Services Research, for his advice and support for the project, and Anne Corden, Senior Research Fellow, for constructive comments on earlier drafts of this paper. The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the research funding body (The Department for Work and Pensions).

Mitchell W & Irvine A (2008) I’m Okay, You’re Okay?: Reflections on the Well-Being and Ethical Requirements of Researchers and Research Participants in Conducting Qualitative Fieldwork Interviews. International Journal of Qualitative Methods December 2008 vol. 7 no. 4 31-44
ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/277172512_I%27m_Okay_You%27re_Okay_Reflections_on_the_Well-Being_and_Ethical_Requirements_of_Researchers_and_Research_Participants_in_Conducting… (accessed Feb 4, 2016).
Publisher (Open Access): http://ijq.sagepub.com/content/7/4/31.full#sec-1

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