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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Ethical Considerations When Using Social Media for Evidence Generation (Papers: Gabrielle Berman, et al | 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on August 21, 2018
 

ABSTRACT
There are significant ethical implications in the adoption of technologies and the production and use of the resulting data for evidence generation. The potential benefits and opportunities need to be understood in conjunction with the potential risks and challenges. When using social media to directly engage children and their communities, or when establishing partnerships with these organizations for data collection and analysis, adoption of these technologies and their resultant data should not be exclusively driven by short-term necessity but also by the long-term needs of our younger partners. When engaging with social media and indeed most technology, thoughtfulness, reflection and ongoing interrogation is required. This paper examines the benefits, risks and ethical considerations when undertaking evidence generation: (a) using social media platforms and (b) using third-party data collected and analysed by social media services. It is supplemented by practical tools to support reflection on the ethical use of social media platforms and social media data.

Berman, Gabrielle; Powell, James; Garcia Herranz, Manuel (2018). Ethical Considerations When Using Social Media for Evidence Generation, Innocenti Discussion Papers no. 2018-01, UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti, Florence https://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/967-ethical-considerations-when-using-social-media-for-evidence-generation-discussion.html

Ethical Considerations When Using Geospatial Technologies for Evidence Generation (Papers: Gabrielle Berman, et al | 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on August 19, 2018
 

ABSTRACT
Geospatial technologies have transformed the way we visualize and understand social phenomena and physical environments. There are significant advantages in using these technologies and data however, their use also presents ethical dilemmas such as privacy and security concerns as well as the potential for stigma and discrimination resulting from being associated with particular locations. Therefore, the use of geospatial technologies and resulting data needs to be critically assessed through an ethical lens prior to implementation of programmes, analyses or partnerships. This paper examines the benefits, risks and ethical considerations when undertaking evidence generation using geospatial technologies. It is supplemented by a checklist that may be used as a practical tool to support reflection on the ethical use of geospatial technologies.

Berman, Gabrielle; de la Rosa, Sara; Accone, Tanya (2018). Ethical Considerations When Using Geospatial Technologies for Evidence Generation, Innocenti Discussion Papers no. 2018-02, UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti, Florence https://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/971-ethical-considerations-when-using-geospatial-technologies-for-evidence-generation.html

Sensitive Data can be Shared (Michael Martin | 2014)0

Posted by Admin in on August 9, 2018
 

A discussion of the legal and ethical context of publishing and sharing sensitive data with two experts who contributed to the ANDS Guide to Publishing & Sharing Sensitive Data.

Provides practical advice about sharing human data as part of ethical research practice (YouTube, 40 min) Baden Appleyard, Barrister, also offers insight into legal requirements.

Martin, M (2014) Sensitive Data can be Shared.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FopQez8P-lU&feature=youtu.be

Ethical conduct in research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and communities0

Posted by Admin in on August 2, 2018
 

In general, ethics guidelines provide a set of principles to ensure research is safe, respectful, responsible, high quality, of benefit to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities and of benefit to research. Ethical conduct in research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and communities: Guidelines for researchers and stakeholders 2018 (the Guidelines) defines six core values — spirit and integrity, cultural continuity, equity, reciprocity, respect, and responsibility. Applying these values and other ethical principles will ensure that research conducted with or for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities, or their data or biological samples, is ethically conducted. 

The Guidelines are intended for use by researchers and ethics review bodies, such as Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, individual research participants, participant groups, the wider community and other stakeholders may also find the Guidelines useful. 

Advice about how to use the Guidelines is provided on page 13. This includes information about Keeping research on track II 2018, which describes how the values and principles in the Guidelines can be put into practice. Additional principles and concepts relevant to research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and communities are set out on pages 15 to 19. Key terms, a glossary and a list of further resources are also provided. More information about the Guidelines is available on NHMRC’s website.

Read the rest of these  guidelines

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