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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Research Ethics: A Source Guide to Conducting Research with Indigenous Peoples (Indigenous Geography 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on November 3, 2016
 

“This free, online resource attempts to keep abreast of scholarship, protocols, and other documents relating to the conduct of research in Indigenous settings.

A great deal of literature and guidelines have emerged regarding appropriate methods and practices for conducting research with Indigenous Peoples. This page intends to keep abreast of these publications and statements. While this list is organized regionally, all sources have contributions to the overall discussion

If you are aware of sources not listed here, or find broken links, please contact the webmaster.

World/General
United States
Canada
Australia
New Zealand
Pacific Islands”

Access the online resource

Edge walking ethics (Papers: Rochelle Stewart-Withers September 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on October 16, 2016
 

Abstract:
Edge walkers are thought to be people who walk between worlds, building bridges between different worldviews. Applying this concept to ethics review, when one is both a researcher and committee member, edge work provides a window for sight and a bridge for crossing between the review committee and the academy, students and supervisors, as well as researchers and research participants. In this article I draw on examples from teaching, research and chairing an ethics committee to highlight some of the ways that I have personally had the opportunity to use my edge walking skills. I use examples to also show how the discipline I belong to Development Studies is in many ways an edge walking discipline. By demystifying various processes and engaging in knowledge exchange, stronger relationships between academics and ethics review are being built. This idea of ethics as means and end is being reinforced.

Stewart-Withers R (2016) Edge walking ethics. New Zealand Sociology, 31(4) pp28-42.
Publisher: https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=339360749751193;res=IELNZC

What does organizational diversity in New Zealand tertiary sector research ethics committees teach us about balancing consultative and governance approaches to ethics review? (Papers: Helen Gremillion, et al 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on October 13, 2016
 

Abstract:
This article compares and contrasts the operational practices of ten tertiary research ethics committees in New Zealand, with an in-depth focus on five of these committees, contributing to an identified goal in the literature of rendering more visible the workings of such committees in order to promote applicant engagement. The authors expand upon a study by Tolich et al. (2015), which collected brief narratives from members of five committees and found that the ways committees are run vary quite significantly. In this article five additional narratives are considered, and all ten are compared, with particular consideration given to review processes for applications, and applicants’ levels of access to committee members and committee deliberations. We focus on the different ways that variously constrained institutions navigate the tension between ethical decision-making as regulatory activity, and researcher participation and engagement in this decision-making process. The reality and value of institutionally-specific operational practices is confirmed, and simultaneously, potential ‘best practice’ options that could be applied more broadly are explored. The article proposes questions for future research that emerge from suggestive patterns and points of contrast in the narratives.

Gremillion H, Snell D, Crosthwaite J, Finch B, Paterson J and Tavinor G (2016) What does organizational diversity in New Zealand tertiary sector research ethics committees teach us about balancing consultative and governance approaches to ethics review? New Zealand Sociology 31(4), pp4-27.
Publisher: https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=339248951923644;res=IELHSS

A narrative account of ethics committees and their codes (Papers: Martin Tolich September 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on October 7, 2016
 

Abstract:
This article is based on an invited speech given at Massey University in August 2016 where Tolich revealed the inspiration for his 25-year sociological analysis of research ethics committees and their codes. The title of the talk “sociologically, do we need ethics committees?” began exploring the stigma ethics committee applicants experience when their qualitative research design does not meet the ethics committee’s biomedical expectations at issue. In 1992 this disjuncture provoked Tolich’s sociological imagination to engage a literature where he found his private troubles were for other sociologists’ public issues, as if these other qualitative researchers collectively experienced a similar stigma. The article reports on Tolich’s attempts to resolve power imbalances between researchers and ethics committees by creating an experimental ethics committees and resources that support the ethics of social science researchers. The second half of the article critiques the codes ethics committees’ use finding they contain little understanding of qualitative research with the potential to harm research participants. The article ends contrasting the impoverishment of New Zealand’s ethics codes with those in Australia, and especially in Canada asking why doesn’t New Zealand have an equivalent National Statement?

Tolich M (2016) A narrative account of ethics committees and their codes. New Zealand Sociology, 31(4) pp43-55.
Publisher: https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=339416648664968;res=IELNZC

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