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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

He Tangata Kei Tua Guidelines for Biobanking with Māori0

Posted by Admin in on December 6, 2016
 

Kei tua o te awe māpara he tangata kē, he mā?

Introduction

Māori ethical frameworks recognise that all research in New Zealand is of interest to Māori and outline community expectations of appropriate behavior in research to deliver the best outcomes for Māori. Research contributes to the broader development objectives of society and this endeavor is being supported by biobanking infrastructure. Ethics has a specific role in guiding key behaviours, processes and methodologies used in research. This document outlines a framework for addressing Māori ethical issues within the context of biobanking. It draws on a foundation of mātauranga (Indigenous knowledge) and tikanga Māori (Māori protocols and practices) and will be useful for researchers, ethics committee members and those who engage in consultation or advice about biobanking with Māori in local, regional, national or international settings.

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Te Ara Tika. Guidelines for Māori research ethics: A framework for researchers and ethics committee members (Guidance and Resource Material | 2010)0

Posted by Admin in on November 16, 2016
 

Introduction
This document outlines a framework for addressing Māori ethical issues within the context of decision-making by ethics committee members. It draws on a foundation of tikanga Māori (Māori protocols and practices) and will be useful for researchers, ethics committee members and those who engage in consultation or advice about Māori ethical issues from a local, regional, national or international perspective.

Context
Research contributes to the broader development objectives of society. Ethics has a specific role in guiding key behaviours, processes and methodologies used in research. International codes of ethics such as the Nuremburg Code (1947)2, the Helsinki Declaration (1964)3, the Belmont Report (1979)4 and, more recently, the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (2005)5 shape the changing ethical standards and professional expectations for researchers.

These codes have often been developed in response to examples of research that resulted in adverse outcomes and/or experiences for participants and their communities. Despite formal processes and codes of ethics there is ongoing evidence of unethical research practice which highlights the importance of the researcher’s own credibility, trust, honesty and integrity vis-à-vis6 the research project and participants.

Table of Contents
Introduction
Context
Tikanga
Purpose
Background to the guidelines and the framework
Whakapapa – He aha te whakapapa o tēnei kaupapa?
Tika – Me pehea e tika ai tēnei kaupapa?
Manaakitanga – Mā wai e manaaki tēnei kaupapa?
Mana – Kei a wai te mana mō tēnei kaupapa?
Implementation
Glossary of Māori terms
Appendix A: Timeline of developments in Māori research ethics
Appendix B: Māori Ethical Frameworks
Appendix C: Characteristics of Māori research

Hudson M, Milne M, Reynolds P, Russell K and Smith B (2010) Te Ara Tika. Guidelines for Māori research ethics: A framework for researchers and ethics committee members. Final Draft. Available at: http://www.hrc.govt.nz/sites/default/files/Te%20Ara%20Tika%20Guidelines%20for%20Maori%20Research%20Ethics.pdf

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Research Ethics: A Source Guide to Conducting Research with Indigenous Peoples (Indigenous Geography 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on November 3, 2016
 

“This free, online resource attempts to keep abreast of scholarship, protocols, and other documents relating to the conduct of research in Indigenous settings.

A great deal of literature and guidelines have emerged regarding appropriate methods and practices for conducting research with Indigenous Peoples. This page intends to keep abreast of these publications and statements. While this list is organized regionally, all sources have contributions to the overall discussion

If you are aware of sources not listed here, or find broken links, please contact the webmaster.

World/General
United States
Canada
Australia
New Zealand
Pacific Islands”

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Edge walking ethics (Papers: Rochelle Stewart-Withers September 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on October 16, 2016
 

Abstract:
Edge walkers are thought to be people who walk between worlds, building bridges between different worldviews. Applying this concept to ethics review, when one is both a researcher and committee member, edge work provides a window for sight and a bridge for crossing between the review committee and the academy, students and supervisors, as well as researchers and research participants. In this article I draw on examples from teaching, research and chairing an ethics committee to highlight some of the ways that I have personally had the opportunity to use my edge walking skills. I use examples to also show how the discipline I belong to Development Studies is in many ways an edge walking discipline. By demystifying various processes and engaging in knowledge exchange, stronger relationships between academics and ethics review are being built. This idea of ethics as means and end is being reinforced.

Stewart-Withers R (2016) Edge walking ethics. New Zealand Sociology, 31(4) pp28-42.
Publisher: https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=339360749751193;res=IELNZC

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