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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Quintet of study retractions rocks criminology community – Science (Dalmeet Singh Chawla | November 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on December 2, 2019
 

Criminology researchers are retracting five studies that have sparked a bitter battle over potential scientific misconduct and issues of race. The episode has riveted the criminology community—and severed a once close relationship after one of the researchers accused his former mentor of falsifying data.

On 10 November, Justin Pickett, a criminologist at the State University of New York in Albany, announced on Twitter that he and his co-authors have agreed to retract a 2011 study published in Criminology that examined public support for taking a suspect’s ethnicity into account at sentencing. Four additional disputed papers, published between 2015 and this year in the journals Criminology, Social Problems, and Law & Society Review, have been or are in the process of being be retracted with the agreement of all the authors, ScienceInsider has learned. Eric Stewart, Pickett’s former mentor and a criminologist at Florida State University (FSU) in Tallahassee, is a co-author of all five studies.

The studies being retracted cover a range of topics. Two found that the number of black people lynched in a U.S. county 100 years ago influences whether white people in the same area today perceive black people as a threat and favor harsh punishments for them. Another examined the role of social context in antiblack and anti-Latino sentiment in the U.S. criminal justice system.

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Breakthrough Gene Therapy Clinical Trial is the World’s First That Aims to Reverse 20 Years of Aging in Humans – CISION (Osvaldo R. Martinez-Clark | November 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on November 28, 2019
 

This is the world’s first IRB-approved clinical trial aimed at reversing aging by at least 20 years; it is also the world’s most expensive pay-to-play trial with a one million price tag to enroll.

This isn’t a human research ethics vignette/scenario, but could very easily be used as the basis for a discussion with researchers, research ethics reviewers, research ethics advisers, or research office staff about:
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  1. Pay-to-play clinical trials
  2. Appropriate recruitment materials
  3. The use of ethics approval as a sales tool
  4. The conduct of trials in another country

MANHATTAN, Kan., Nov. 21, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Libella Gene Therapeutics, LLC (“Libella”) announces an institutional review board (IRB)-approved pay-to-play clinical trial in Colombia (South America) using gene therapy that aims to treat and ultimately cure aging. This could lead to Libella offering the world’s only treatment to cure and reverse aging by 20 years.
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Under Libella’s pay-to-play model, trial participants will be enrolled in their country of origin after paying $1 million. Participants will travel to Colombia to sign their informed consent and to receive the Libella gene therapy under a strictly controlled hospital environment.
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Traditionally, aging has been viewed as a natural process. This view has shifted, and now scientists believe that aging should be seen as a disease. The research in this field has led to the belief that the kingpin of aging in humans is the shortening of our telomeres.
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Telomeres are the body’s biological clock. Every time a cell divides, telomeres shorten, and our cells become less efficient at dividing again. This is why we age. A significant number of scientific peer-reviewed studies have confirmed this. Some of these studies have shown actual age reversal in every way imaginable simply by lengthening telomeres.
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Holiday funny – Potential participant duped0

Posted by Admin in on November 28, 2019
 

Cartoon by Don Mayne www.researchcartoons.com

Thanks Giving isn’t a holiday in Australasia and animal ethics really isn’t our thing, but we thought this Don Mayne cartoon was a chance to reflect on two ethical challenges in human research:
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(i) Purporting to recruit participants for a research project when your motives are otherwise – which is potentially a merit & integrity and respect problem; and
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(ii) Having a research topic and recruitment strategy that don’t match.
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Which will almost certainly lead to participant complaints.

(Australia) Skin cancer doctor in hot water after papers retracted – The Age (Liam Mannix and Tom Cowie | November 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on November 24, 2019
 

For most, sailing the Mediterranean on a luxury cruise ship is a relaxing escape. But skin cancer expert Professor Anthony Dixon was working. And a storm was about to hit the credibility of his research.

Over the 12-day cruise, the professor spent nine hours teaching doctors and nurses how to recognise skin cancer. A prominent educator, Professor Dixon has trained dozens of health professionals in his methods, many of them on cruise ships.

But two of his journal articles were about to be retracted after complaints from other cancer experts that they contained factual errors. Such retractions are considered rare and necessary to prevent inaccurate information being available to other practitioners.

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