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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007) – Updated with new link to July 2018 update0

Posted by Admin in on July 12, 2018
 

National Statement 2018 coverThe National Statement is the Australian national reference for human research. It was issued by the NHMRC and has been endorsed by the ARC and UA. The document articulates the four core principles of merit and integrity, beneficence, justice and respect for persons. Specific advice is provided with regard to benefits and risk, informed consent, privacy, methodologies and potential participant populations. Guidance is also provided with regard to the appointment and operation of human research ethics committees, the conduct of ethical reviews, and the responsibilities of institutions. Even though the document has not been enacted compliance with the National Statement is a strict condition of NHMRC and ARC funding.

Since 2014 a joint working group (including appointees from AHEC, the ARC and UA) have been conducting a rolling review of the National Statement. Dr Allen is involved in this rolling review.

In 2015-17 a joint drafting committee (including appointees from AHEC, the ARC and UA) drafted changes and addition to the chapters in Section 3 of the National Statement, as well as corresponding changes to Section 5 and the glossary Dr Allen, Prof Israel and Prof Thomson, are involved in this rolling review.

Access – the PDF copy | the NS page

National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia (2007, updated 2018) National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. Available at: https://nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/national-statement-ethical-conduct-human-research-2007-updated-2018

Research ethics committees in the Pacific Islands: gaps and opportunities for health sector strengthening (Papers: Justin T Denholm, et al | 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on July 8, 2018
 

Abstract
There has been a range of developments in recent years to stimulate increasing public health research activity throughout the Pacific. Development of local capacity for ethics committee review and oversight is, however, frequently underdeveloped. This is reflected in the number of Pacific Island nations where ethics committees have not been established or where only informal processes exist for ethics review and oversight. This is problematic for the optimal development of relevant and culturally appropriate research, and building up local ethics committees should be part of continued research development in the Pacific. Three areas in which local ethics committees may add value are 1) offering better capacity to reflect local priorities, 2) providing broader benefits for research capacity building, and 3) assisting to strengthen systems beyond research ethics. This article considers benefits and challenges for ethics committees in the Pacific, and suggests directions for regional development to further strengthen public health research activity.

Keywords: research ethics, Pacific Islands, operational research, public health, ethics

J. T. Denholm, K. Bissell, K. Viney, A. M. Durand, H. L. Cash, C. Roseveare, O. E. Merilles, Jr., A. D. Harries and S. Biribo (2017) Research ethics committees in the Pacific Islands: gaps and opportunities for health sector strengthening. Public Health Action. 2017 Mar 21; 7(1): 6–9. Published online 2017 Mar 21. doi: 10.5588/pha.16.0076 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5526493/

Open access

(Philippines) National Ethical Guidelines for Health and Health-Related Research (PHREB | 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on July 5, 2018
 

Prepared by the Philippine Health Research Ethics Board Ad Hoc Committee for Updating the National Ethical Guidelines

R E S O L U T I O N “RECOGNIZING DR. MARITA V.T. REYES AND THE MEMBERS OF THE AD HOC COMMITTEE FOR THEIR EFFORTS ON THE REVISION OF THE NATIONAL ETHICAL GUIDELINES”

WHEREAS, the Ad Hoc Committee for the Updating of the National Ethical Guidelines was created to update the existing ethical guidelines to ensure adherence to local, national, and international principles and values and respect for Filipino morals and culture;

WHEREAS, the Ad Hoc Committee for the Updating of the National Ethical Guidelines was created on 13 January 2015, with Dr. Marita V.T. Reyes as Chair and the following as members: Dr. Rosario Angeles T. Alora, Dr. Leonardo D. de Castro, Prof. Edlyn B. Jimenez, Dr. Ricardo M. Manalastas, Jr., Dr. Evangeline O. Santos, and Dr. Cecilia V. Tomas;

WHEREAS the Ad Hoc Committee has completed its draft and the Philippine Health Research Ethics Board (PHREB) has approved the National Ethical Guidelines for Health and Health-Related Research 2017 (NEGHHR 2017);

Access the Filippino health research guidelines

Philippine Health Research Ethics Board (2017) National Ethical Guidelines for Health and Health Related Research. Manila: Department of Science and Technology – Philippine Council for Health Research and Development. http://www.ethics.healthresearch.ph/index.php/phoca-downloads/category/4-neg

The Dying Scientist and his Rogue Vaccine Trial – Wired (Amanda Schaffer | May 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on June 18, 2018
 

Bill Halford was convinced he’d found a miracle cure, but he was running out of time to prove it. So he teamed up with a Hollywood executive and recruited a band of desperate patients.

IN A PHOTO from 2009, Bill Halford, who was then 40 years old, looks like a schoolboy who hasn’t quite grown into his big ears. He wears an ill-fitting red shirt tucked into belted khakis; his jawline is square and his eyes are full of wonder. The picture was taken at Southern Illinois University, where he was a respected professor. A few years before, he had made a significant discovery—one that would determine the course of his life.

Halford, a microbiologist, had taken an interest in the peculiar nature of herpes—how it lies dormant in the nervous system and reactivates to cause disease. Herpes is one of the most pervasive viral infections in the world, sometimes causing painful genital blisters, and it has frustrated scientists attempting to find a cure. But in 2007, Halford realized that a weakened form of the virus he’d been studying might serve as a vaccine. He designed an experiment in which he inoculated mice with this variant, then exposed them to the wild-type form of the virus. In 2011 he published the results: Virtually all the mice survived. By contrast, animals that were not injected with his vaccine died in large numbers. It was promising science.

That same year, however, Halford became seriously ill. At first he thought he had a sinus infection, but it turned out to be a rare and aggressive form of cancer, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma. Halford was 42 years old at the time, with two teenage children. He underwent chemotherapy and radiation followed by surgery, but he was told that the form of cancer he had did not usually stay at bay for long. Halford had always been determined—“a 90-hours-a-week sort of researcher,” as his wife, Melanie Halford, puts it. The cancer diagnosis only seemed to harden his focus. Others had tried, and failed, to develop a herpes vaccine, but Halford was convinced that his method—using a live, attenuated form of the virus—would succeed. He would use whatever time he had left to show he was right.

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