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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Six Provocations for Big Data (Papers: Boyd and Crawford 2011)0

Posted by Admin in on January 9, 2016
 

Abstract: The era of Big Data has begun. Computer scientists, physicists, economists, mathematicians, political scientists, bio-informaticists, sociologists, and many others are clamoring for access to the massive quantities of information produced by and about people, things, and their interactions. Diverse groups argue about the potential benefits and costs of analyzing information from Twitter, Google, Verizon, 23andMe, Facebook, Wikipedia, and every space where large groups of people leave digital traces and deposit data. Significant questions emerge. Will large-scale analysis of DNA help cure diseases? Or will it usher in a new wave of medical inequality? Will data analytics help make people’s access to information more efficient and effective? Or will it be used to track protesters in the streets of major cities? Will it transform how we study human communication and culture, or narrow the palette of research options and alter what ‘research’ means? Some or all of the above?

This essay offers six provocations that we hope can spark conversations about the issues of Big Data. Given the rise of Big Data as both a phenomenon and a methodological persuasion, we believe that it is time to start critically interrogating this phenomenon, its assumptions, and its biases.

(This paper was presented at Oxford Internet Institute’s “A Decade in Internet Time: Symposium on the Dynamics of the Internet and Society” on September 21, 2011.)

Boyd D and Crawford K (2011), Six Provocations for Big Data. A Decade in Internet Time: Symposium on the Dynamics of the Internet and Society, September 2011. Retrieved from SSRN:http://ssrn.com/abstract=1926431 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1926431 (accessed 15 March 2015)

(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

Exploring Ethical and Methodological Issues in Internet-Based Research with Adolescents (Papers: Heather Battles 2010)0

Posted by Admin in on January 9, 2016
 

Abstract: Internet-based research is a relatively new and growing field that presents a number of ethical challenges regarding privacy, confidentiality, and informed consent. In light of a study examining discussions regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on a publicly viewable Internet message board among primarily American, Australian, and Canadian female adolescents and young adults, the author discusses the methodological and ethical concerns surrounding Internet-based qualitative research with youth. The author first provides some contextual background about the study and issues surrounding the HPV vaccine. She describes her methods of data collection and analysis and provides a summary of the results. The author then explores a number of ethical issues that arise in Internet-based research and examines her own ethical decision-making as informed by existing discussions and guidelines in this area.

Keywords: Internet, methodology, ethics, online research, adolescents, HPV, vaccination

Battles HT (2010) Exploring Ethical and Methodological Issues in Internet-Based Research with Adolescents. International Journal of Qualitative Methods 9(1): 27-39. Available at: http://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/IJQM/article/viewFile/5017/6480 (accessed 23 December 2013).

(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

Sage Research Online – Research Ethics0

Posted by Admin in on January 3, 2016
 

If your institution has a subscription to Sage then you have online access to a slew of research ethics material on their site including all the Sage books that cover research ethics (Israel, Hammersley, Denzin et al, Sieber and Tolich, Mertens and Ginsberg), handbooks and articles.

It is a veritable goldmine of research methods and ethics material.

For example, if you do a search for Mark Israel’s ‘Social Research Ethics’ you will find a number of useful texts.

See http://srmo.sagepub.com/page/tips-and-tutorials/tutorials for more information.

JIF-boosting stratagems – Which are appropriate and which not? (Paper: B Martin, 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on November 14, 2015
 

Journal editors report having come under pressure to increase the Journal Impact Factor of their publication. Unfortunately, this has spawned a range of questionable editorial practices designed to game the system, including adding multiple citations to the journal in journal editorials, increasing self-citation within the journal by pressurising authors, creating publication rings of self-citation practices between a small number of allied journals, queuing articles online for up to two years before hard publication. In a substantial and welcome editorial piece, Research Policy analyses these trends and argues that in compromising their own integrity editors are forfeiting their authority over other forms of research misconduct.

Martin, B. (2016) Editorial: Editors’ JIF-boosting stratagems – Which are appropriate and which not? Research Policy 45, 1–7.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048733315001390
(Required university/ScienceDirect login)

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