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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Facebook’s got a new privacy policy, and it plans to share your data with partners (Papers: Munson L 2015)0

Posted by Admin in on January 10, 2016
 

“Late last year you may recall receiving a message from Facebook saying that its privacy policy was set to change again.

But can you remember when the new policy was due to come into effect?

Well, it’s already arrived and, if you have logged into your account at any point since its implementation on Friday, you’ve already agreed to its terms and conditions.”

Munson L (2015, 2 February) Facebook’s got a new privacy policy, and it plans to share your data with partners. Naked Security by Sophos. Retrieved from https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2015/02/02/facebooks-got-a-new-privacy-policy-and-it-plans-to-share-your-data-with-partners/ (accessed 3 December 2015)

(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks (Papers: Kramer A and Hancock J 2014)0

Posted by Admin in on January 10, 2016
 

Abstract: Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others’ positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people.

Kramer A D., Guillory, J E., & Hancock J T (2014). Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(24), 8788-8790.
http://www.pnas.org/content/111/24/8788.full

(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

Also see
1. (25/03/14) Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks
2. (01/04/14) Facebook fiasco: was Cornell’s study of ‘emotional contagion’ an ethics breach? 
3. (10/05/15) Social media personhood as a challenge to research ethics: Exploring the case of the Facebook experiment
4. (10/05/15) Untangling research and practice: What Facebook’s “emotional contagion” study teaches us
5. (20/05/16) Scientists are just as confused about the ethics of big-data research as you
6. (17/06/16) Are Research Ethics Obsolete In The Era Of Big Data?

Digital, Social & Mobile Worldwide in 2015 (Papers: Kemp S 2015)0

Posted by Admin in on January 10, 2016
 

“2014 was a landmark year for growth across all things digital, and We Are Social’s new Digital, Social and Mobile in 2015 report indicates that this year will see even more impressive numbers.

Including stats for more than 240 countries around the world, and profiling 30 of the world’s biggest economies in detail, this report is the most comprehensive, free compendium of up-to-date digital statistics and data you’ll find.

So what do its 376 pages reveal?”

Kemp S (2015) Digital, Social & Mobile Worldwide in 2015 Retrieved from http://wearesocial.com.au/blog/2015/01/22/digital-social-mobile-worldwide-2015/ (accessed 1 December 2015)

(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

#SocialEthics: A guide to embedding ethics in social media research (Papers: Evans et al 2015)0

Posted by Admin in on January 9, 2016
 

“This report on social media research ethics is a part of the Wisdom of the Crowd project, sponsored by Innovate UK, the UK’s innovation agency, with funding contributions from the TSB, the EPSRC and the ESRC. lpsos MORI, CASM Consulting LLP, Demos and University of Sussex have collaborated in this project to critically examine commercial possibilities for social media research.

Given that this report was published quite some time before the Cambridge Analytica story broke, its reflections on information published to social media and express consent being necessary for research use, are likely still to be relevant.

One of the focuses of the Wisdom of the Crowd project is to examine the ethical landscape surrounding aggregated social media research. In spring 2015, the first publication of this ethics strand contained a review of the legal and regulatory framework for using social media in market research2. This second and final report builds on these findings, presenting our conclusions from quantitative and qualitative primary research with stakeholders and social media users, and outlining our recommendations for how the research industry should look to proceed if it is to be at the forefront of using social media data in an ethical way.
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The scope of the ethical review is focussed on large-scale, aggregated analysis of social media data sometimes referred to as ‘social l istening’. We regard this kind of research as potentially fruitful in the social insight it can be provide, and we are generally excited about the possibilities for this a new social research methodology; however, we are concerned that the guidelines for ethical best practice are incoherent and inadequate. The volume of data collected through this method presents barriers to traditional ethical research frameworks: this new kind of research also fits into the wider ethical context of using algorithms to analyse people’s personal data. Consideration therefore needs to be given to how this kind of research can be conducted ethically.”
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Harry Evans; Steve Ginnis; Jamie Bartlett (2015) #SocialEthics: A guide to embedding ethics in social media research. Retrieved from: https://www.ipsos.com/sites/default/files/migrations/en-uk/files/Assets/Docs/Publications/im-demos-social-ethics-in-social-media-research-summary.pdf  (accessed 13 November 2018).
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(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

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