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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

How to organize a conference that’s open to everyone – Nature (Nic Fleming | July 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on August 17, 2019
 

Thinking about the needs of all participants is key to a successful event.

Having enjoyed their meal in a neo-Gothic, wood-panelled grand hall, most delegates were on their way to the afternoon sessions. Meanwhile, Caroline Miles had just spent 20 minutes sitting in her wheelchair looking at the back of the delivery van blocking her path to both the talk and the lunch.

The simple strategies described in this piece speak not only to respect and justice in our endeavours, failing to be inclusive can significantly limit the relevance and impact of our work.  Gary has been compiling anecdotes from the field that would make you cry with laughter, or just cry.

Miles, a solicitor turned independent-researcher specializing in legal issues relating to social care, describes her attendance at the Socio-Legal Studies Association (SLSA) annual meeting at the University of Bristol, UK, last March as “demeaning and embarrassing and just horrible”. The talks took place across two buildings, and the lifts were frequently filled with participants who could have used nearby stairs. Her access was blocked by delivery vehicles on two occasions. When this made her late, sessions had to be interrupted as tables and chairs were rearranged to fit her in. Miles was provided with a dedicated support worker by the university, but says that networking took place in standing spaces that had no chairs at her level, and that access to disabled toilets was blocked by participants having refreshments.
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As Miles waited for someone to find the driver of the delivery vehicle blocking her way into the main meeting venue for the second time, she finally gave up. “I burst into tears and said, ‘That’s it, I’m going home’.”
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Journals retract more than a dozen studies from China that may have used executed prisoners’ organs – Retraction Watch (Ivan Oransky | August 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on August 15, 2019
 

In the past month, PLOS ONE and Transplantation have retracted fifteen studies by authors in China because of suspicions that the authors may have used organs from executed prisoners.

All of the original studies — seven in Transplantation, and eight in PLOS ONE — were published between 2008 and 2014. Two involved kidney transplants, and the rest involved liver transplants. Two other journals, the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology and Kidney International, have recently issued expressions of concern for the same reason.

In an editorial explaining the seven retractions from its journal, the editors of Transplantation write:

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Fraud In A Leading UK Scientist’s Lab – BuzzFeed News (Peter Aldhous | July 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on August 14, 2019
 

David Latchman was never punished for leading a University College London lab that published more than a dozen fraudulent studies, according to newly released investigation documents.

David Latchman, a leading geneticist and one of the highest-paid university leaders in the UK, was last year found responsible for failing to properly supervise a lab in which widespread scientific fraud occurred over many years.

Two investigation reports found data falsification in a total of nine scientific papers published by members of a lab Latchman ran at University College London, according to documents released to BuzzFeed News under a Freedom of Information request.

Latchman did not have direct involvement in the manipulation and reuse of images to falsify scientific results, investigators found.

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Long-Term Agreement for Services (LTAS) for the Provision of Global Research Quality Assurance Services and an Ethical Review Facility for Evidence Generation (Request for proposal | August 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on August 13, 2019
 

UNICEF is putting out a call for tenders for a Global Ethical Review Facility for the organisation. This would entail undertaking ethical reviews of evidence generation projects across the organization and providing advice on possible mitigation strategies.

Information can be found here: https://www.ungm.org/public/Notice/95212

Gabrielle Berman, PhD
Senior Advisor – Ethics in Evidence Generation
UNICEF Innocenti
Via degli Alfani, 58
Firenze, Italia
50122
Skype: gabrielle.berman

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