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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Queensland unis marked “satisfactory” for handling research fraud – Campus Morning Mail (July 2020)0

Posted by Admin in on July 15, 2020
 

Last year the Queensland corruption commission decided to investigate 21 allegations of research fraud, by examining policies and practises at Uni Queensland Uni, Southern Queensland and QUT

In May ’19 the Crime and Corruption Commission announced an audit of “prevention measure” and how universities responded to allegations of research fraud, (CMM May 10). No universities are identified in the report now released.

Overall the report finds the three universities it investigated have “satisfactory” complaints management and prevention systems.

However, there are specific recommendations on improving policies and processes dealing with peer review, conflict of interest and compliance with the national voluntary best-practice code.

Read the rest of this discussion piece
Also see the CCC Report

Covid-19 studies based on flawed Surgisphere data force medical journals to review processes – The Guardian (Melissa Davey | June 2020)0

Posted by Admin in on July 13, 2020
 

New England Journal of Medicine and Lancet peer reviewers did not see raw data behind findings before publication

Some of the world’s leading medical journals are reviewing their processes after they were forced to retract studies based on flawed data.

None of the peer reviewers who examined a questionable study on the impact of blood pressure medications on Covid-19 saw the raw data behind the findings before it was approved for publication in world-renowned medical journal, the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study was based on a massive dataset supposedly gathered from hospitals worldwide by a US company called Surgisphere, but a Guardian investigation has since revealed the database to be seriously flawed. The revelation, combined with concerns highlighted by scientists worldwide about the data, prompted the journal to retract the study. The Lancet, another leading medical journal, also published a study based on the Surgisphere database.

Read the rest of this discussion piece

COVID-19 research: pandemic versus “paperdemic”, integrity, values and risks of the “speed science” (Papers: Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira | April 2020)0

Posted by Admin in on July 11, 2020
 

Abstract

This open access paper from April 2020 makes familiar arguments about the problem of junk science and COVID-19, but they are points worth repeating and we loved the first sentence of the abstract.  We have included links to 16 related items.

Scientific integrity is a learned skill. When researchers and students learn integrity in laboratories or in the classroom, they are empowered to use similar principles in other aspects of their lives. This commentary reviews the concepts related to scientific integrity at a time when science faces important challenges related to the increase(d) number of articles produced regarding research on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has ignited another parallel viral pandemic, with science ranging from robust studies to dishonest studies being conducted, posted, and shared at an unprecedented rate. A balance is needed between the benefits of the rapid access to new scientific data and the threat of causing panic or erroneous clinical decisions based on mistakes or misconduct. The truth is that the “scientific research has changed the world” but now, and more than ever, “it needs to change itself”. A pandemic with a “paperdemic” will be even more complicated to manage if it progresses in an uncontrolled manner and is not properly scrutinized.

Keywords:
SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, research and academic integrity, peer review, pandemic, paperdemic

Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira (2020) COVID-19 research: pandemic versus “paperdemic”, integrity, values and risks of the “speed science”, Forensic Sciences Research, DOI: 10.1080/20961790.2020.1767754
Publisher (Open Access): https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20961790.2020.1767754

Historicizing the crisis of scientific misconduct in Indian science (Papers: Mahendra Shahare & Lissa Roberts | June 2020)0

Posted by Admin in on July 11, 2020
 

Abstract

The Indian experience and recent approach is worth emulating.  National approaches should focus on institutions, structural incentives and only after that research culture.

A flurry of discussions about plagiarism and predatory publications in recent times has brought the issue of scientific misconduct in India to the fore. The debate has framed scientific misconduct in India as a recent phenomenon. This article questions that framing, which rests on the current tendency to define and police scientific misconduct as a matter of individual behavior. Without ignoring the role of individuals, this article contextualizes their actions by calling attention to the conduct of the institutions, as well as social and political structures that are historically responsible for governing the practice of science in India since the colonial period. Scientific (mis)conduct, in other words, is here examined as a historical phenomenon borne of the interaction between individuals’ aspirations and the systems that impose, measure, and reward scientific output in particular ways. Importantly, historicizing scientific misconduct in this way also underscores scientist-driven initiatives and regulatory interventions that have placed India at the leading edge of reform. With the formal establishment of the Society for Scientific Values in 1986, Indian scientists became the first national community worldwide to monitor research integrity in an institutionally organized way.
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Keywords
Scientific misconduct, fraud in science, research integrity, the Society for Scientific Values, India

Shahare, M., & Roberts, L. (2020). Historicizing the crisis of scientific misconduct in Indian science. History of Sciencehttps://doi.org/10.1177/0073275320930908
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0073275320930908

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