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(China) Academic misconduct standards to be tightened – China Daily Global (Li Yan | October 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on January 2, 2020
 

China has strengthened its fight against academic misconduct by publishing new standards defining plagiarism, fabrication, falsification and other violations of research integrity. Experts believe the clarity will make it easier to discipline researchers who violate the rules.

The document, issued by the Ministry of Science and Technology, has been adopted by 20 government agencies ranging from China’s Supreme People’s Court to the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Depending on the severity of the offense, punishments can range from canceling a project’s funding to revoking the offender’s titles and permanently banning them from promotion or other research positions. Institutes that connive with or shield violators will also be punished with budget cuts or judicial action.

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A reviewer stole a manuscript and published it himself. But you wouldn’t know it from this retraction notice – Retraction Watch (Adam Marcus | February 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on December 30, 2019
 

Fish off someone else’s peer review!

So writes (in somewhat different words) Mina Mehregan, a mechanical engineer at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in Iran. Mehregan and a colleague recently discovered that they’d been victimized by a group of unscrupulous reviewers who used the pretext of a long turnaround time to publish a hijacked version of their manuscript in another journal.

In a guest editorial for the Journal of Korean Medical Science — which wasn’t involved in the heist — Mehregan began by noting the toll that protracted peer review can take on authors:

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(US) This Researcher Exploited Prisoners, Children, and the Elderly. Why Does Penn Honor Him? – The Chronicle of Higher Education (Alexander Kafka, | November 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on December 29, 2019
 

Albert M. Kligman was a larger-than-life dermatologist and entrepreneur instrumental in inventions that brought riches to him and his university. He also performed torturous experiments.

Over the last 12 years we have shared a few pieces about egregious ethical breaches, but we aren’t sure what stunned us most, what was done to those vulnerable Americans or that the track record of the lead researcher is still being celebrated.

“An outstanding clinician, researcher, and educator.” “A visionary leader” who led “an extraordinary life.” That’s how the University of Pennsylvania describes Albert M. Kligman on a fund-raising page for a lectureship in his name. He is also honored by not one but two chaired professorships.
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What the university calls his “pioneering work with Retin-A” was estimated by a student turned critic of Kligman, Bernard Ackerman, as generating in the “many tens of millions.” Kligman himself once described to a television interviewer the sales of the acne medicine as an “explosion …a very considerable sum of money that comes to our department in the form of royalties. We are swimming in cash.”
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Guidelines to Counter Foreign Interference in the Australian University Sector (University Foreign Interference Taskforce November 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on December 28, 2019
 

CONTEXT STATEMENT

A defining factor in the world-class performance and reputation of Australia’s university system is its openness to the world. the globally engaged nature of our universities is indispensable to their success. Indeed, it is the bedrock of their competitiveness.

This global engagement enables Australia to make cutting-edge research breakthroughs as our own world-class academics work in collaboration with others worldwide at the forefront of their field. It enables us to educate many of the world’s best students, who return home after graduation with an enduring knowledge of, and lifelong affection for Australia, a powerful soft power asset for the nation. It enables Australia to recruit outstanding global experts to teach and conduct research in our universities, catapulting our capacity ahead of our competitors. And it ensures the learning and the alumni networks of Australian university students are enriched by classmates from all around the world. International experience and collaboration is integral to the academic career path around the world. A global exchange of ideas is enabled by this exchange of people.

The Australian government supports such international collaborations through its programs and policy settings across a wide range of initiatives and portfolios. these include appropriate visa settings and the new global talent visa; a comprehensive program of Australian trade commission work to promote international education; the new colombo Plan; the eligibility of international academics for several Australian national competitive grant schemes; the provision of targeted research funds such as the Australia-china science and Research Fund and the Australia-India strategic Research Fund; and providing support for Australian students and academic staff to travel internationally…

CONTENTS
Context Statement 4
the threat environment 6
Introduction 7
How to use these guidelines 9
Governance and risk frameworks 10
Due diligence 14
Communication and education 20
Knowledge sharing 22
Cyber security 24
Best practice considerations 25
Appendix 1: University Foreign Interference Taskforce 33
Appendix 2: Government departments and contacts 34
Appendix 3: Case studies 38
Appendix 4: Scenario 40
Appendix 5: Glossary 41
Appendix 6: Acronyms 43
Appendix 7: Resources and guidance materials 44

University Foreign Interference Taskforce (2019). Guidelines to counter foreign interference in the Australian university sector. Retrieved from Analysis and Policy Observatory Website: 29/12/19
https://apo.org.au/node/267726

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